Starting Up

Starting Up

 

Starting a business is an empowering yet daunting time. The start-up costs are generally high and the returns in the first few months are low or non-existent.

 

Here you will find advice on some of the key areas of concern when starting your business. 

Hiring & Managing Employees

Trademark (UK, EU, US, China)


What is it?

One of the best ways of protecting your business name, brand and logo from being copied is to register a trademark. A trademark is a distinctive sign eg name, brand, logo or tagline (or a combination of these) used by a business to distinguish its goods and or services from those sold by another business and to identify its business as the source of those goods and services.

In the UK, trademarks are granted by the UK Intellectual Property Office (UK IPO) Registering a trademark increases the protection it receives and stops others from using it.

You may be able to register a trademark over

  1. words (eg the trademark “Nandos”)
  2. pictures and words (eg the Pure Business Law trademark).
  3. slogans (eg the Lidl strap line “Big on quality, Lidl on price”)
  4. colours (eg the Cadbury Dairy Milk purple as owned by Kraft ).
  5. sounds (eg the Match of the Day theme song played when their logo appears at the beginning of football matches) and
  6. Logos (eg the Mac OS logo);
  7. 3D shapes (eg the Pepsi cola bottle shape)
Why is it important?

Registering a name or a logo gives you the following three benefits:

  1. Allows you to object if someone else applies to register ay name or logo that is similar to your trademark for the same of similar goods or services. This protection does not cover an application to use the same name or branding for a different type of business. For instance if you register “Fast-Sports” for a trade mark for selling sports cars, no one could register “Fast-Spots” for anything to do with selling cars but they may be able to register it as a trade mark for a dry-cleaning business because that has nothing to do with cars.
  2. If another business tries to use the same or similar branding on similar goods or services thereby infringing your trademark you can take legal proceedings to stop them.
  3. Your business’s goodwill and reputation have commercial value so registering a trademark is an easy way to protect your hard work and creativity.

Registering a trademark gives you the exclusive right to use it for 10 years, after which you must make an application to renew it to the Intellectual Property Office (IPO). Their website is at www.ipo.gov.uk.

You can register your trademarks in the UK, the EU and or internationally. All registrations last for 10years and are renewable indefinitely in further 10-year periods. The most suitable registration for your brand will depend on where you do business eg UK, EU or internationally.

Risks

If you do not register your name, brand or logo as a trademark you will not be able to easily stop other people using your trademark and you may end up allowing other businesses to profit from your hard work.




Patent (Worldwide)


What is it?

Protect your invention through a patent. A patent gives you an exclusive right over a novel invention that you have created. It gives you the exclusive right to use and reproduce your invention and stop people copying your invention without your permission. For instance, only Apple can make and sell Apple phones.

In the UK, patents are granted by the UK Intellectual Property Office (UK IPO) To have a patent over something you have created, you must register it at the IPO. Patents generally last for up to twenty years.

You can only patent a novel invention and cannot patent something that is already in the public domain. This means that your invention must be new (i.e. you cannot patent something which already exists eg a literary work, method of medical treatment, a diagnosis, scientific theory or a discovery) . You also cannot patent something which is already the subject of a patent application pre-dating your application. This means that you must carry out extensive market research examining trade journals and academic papers relevant to your industry market and searching for patents and patent applications on the patent registers worldwide. Obtaining a patent is expensive and time consuming. You should enlist the help of a professional eg lawyer or patent agent before starting an application for a patent.

Why is it important?

Should I register my invention as a patent?

Yes, you should if you believe that you have created a novel product or process which is so important to your business that you wish to pay a patent application fee to prevent others from using it.

Risks

Registering your invention as a patent ensures that:

  1. You can prevent others using your product or process if they intend to use it for commercial purposes.
  2. You can profit from your patent by only permitting certain people to use it for commercial purposes and only on condition that they pay you or give you a percentage of the profits they make from using your patent.

Risks

If you do not register your invention as a patent, you will not be able to easily stop other people copying your ideas and you may end up allowing other businesses to profit from your hard work.

You can use free online databases to search for patents eg Ipsum the UK IPO’s search facility, the Patents Journal (for UK applications that have been filed but not yet published), Espacenet – the European Patents Office’s (EPO’s) free database for worldwide patents including UK patents and Patentscope – the World Intellectual Property Organisation’s (WIPO’s ) free database for worldwide patents including UK patents. Note that these databases may not be up to date.

As an alternative you may prefer to use professional search services such as :

  1. The PATLIB (patent library) centre
  2. A Patent attorney through the Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys at www. cipa.org.uk




IP Assignment Agreement


What is it? An IP assignment agreement transfers rights and ownership in an IP created by one person to someone else or to a business. It can be used to transfer rights in a trademark, patent, logo, designs or any other IP. Why is it important? An IP assignment agreement is important when a business is sold, and the founder created intellectual property before becoming a part of the company or a company employs a someone whether consultant or employee to do some work.




Registering Designs


What is it?

Register your design to stop someone else from using it.

A design right is a right that you have which can protect your original design from being copied by someone else.There are two different types of design rights – registered and unregistered design rights which can protect the look or appearance of a product from being copied.

Why is it important?

Design rights can exist in computer icons, logos, graphic designs, packaging and clothing. The rights do not arise by reference to the particular product but rather in the shape or look of either the whole of the product or part of that product. For instance, a registered design right in a motif used on a book will be infringed if someone else uses the same design motif on a duvet cover.

In the UK, design registrations are granted by the UK Intellectual Property Office (UK IPO).

Risks

Even if you do not register your design, it will still be automatically protected as an unregistered design right. However this right is more limited right because it only protects you against unauthorised copying and does not prevent other people creating similar designs independently.

For businesses in the UK these unregistered design rights arise automatically in the UK and the EU for some designs under both UK and EU law if the relevant criteria are met. In the UK, unregistered design rights arise as soon as the relevant designs are recorded in some way eg in a drawing and in the UK as soon as they are made available to the public. However, the protection granted differs slightly in each jurisdiction. For instance in the UK unregistered design rights will automatically protect either the shape or configuration of the whole or part of an article for up to 15 years, whereas in the EU unregistered design rights will automatically protect not only the appearance of the whole or part of any industrial or handicraft product resulting from its features but also its lines, shape, texture, contours and materials but only for up to 3 years.

You should therefor keep a watching brief and consider whether such a right has arisen as soon as you believe that either you or your employees (in the course of their employment) have created an original design.

Brexit

The UK and the EU have agreed that there will be an implementation period (ie transition period) from the date the UK left the EU i.e. 31 January 2020 until 31 December 2020 or a later date if the transition period is extended. During this period there will be no changes to unregistered design rights.

UK unregistered design rights

UK unregistered design rights will continue after the transition period and provide up to 15 years of protection. However, after the transition period the UK Government has advised that only UK residents or businesses incorporated in the UK will be eligible for UK registered designs.

EU unregistered design rights

From the end of the transition period unregistered design rights in the EU (ie unregistered Community designs) will no longer be valid in the IK. The government has advised that it will immediately replace the unregistered Community design rights with UK unregistered design rights ( to be known as UK continuing unregistered design rights) and which will offer protection in the EU and UK for the rest of the three year terms previously attached to the unregistered Community design right. This means you will continue to be protected in the EU and UK for unregistered Community designs that existed before the end of the transition period.

If you are concerned about how to protect your unregistered design rights in the UK and EU after the transition period please contact our IP lawyers for further advice on 01234 938089.




Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA)/Letter of confidentiality


What is it?

This agreement protects confidential information belonging to your business including IP and other information which you do not want to be made public.

Why is it important?

It is important to have an NDA in place before sharing any confidential or sensitive information in business meetings with people with whom you intend to do business eg investors, prospective co-founders, suppliers, consultants and the like. A letter of confidentiality is similar to a non-disclosure agreement. The party disclosing confidential information imposes restrictions as to the use of this confidential information to the party receiving it.

Risks

If you do not have the required safeguards in place to protect your intellectual property during business meetings or negotiations you may have your designs, inventions or work stolen or copied by the person with whom you are negotiating. This could be disastrous for your business.




one-way confidentiality agreement


What is it? A one-way Confidentiality agreement is similar to a non-disclosure agreement but imposes restrictions as to the use of this confidential information only on one party.




Assignment of intellectual property


What is it?

An IP assignment agreement transfers rights and ownership in an IP created by one-person eg trademark, patent, logo, designs or any other IP to someone else or to a business.

Why is it important?

An IP assignment agreement is important when a business is sold, and the founder created intellectual property before becoming a part of the company or a company employs a someone whether consultant or employee to do some work. If you assign IP rights to another business, you are transferring ownership of the IP.

It is more common to licence intellectual property rights than to assign them in business. Licensing allows a third party to have rights over the IP and do certain acts with the IP that they would not otherwise have been able to do but you keep ownership of the IP. You can limit the licence to a certain area eg the UK, Middle East, Africa etc or to a certain period of time eg 1 year, 2 years etc.

Risks

If for example you assign your IP to a business and it fails, you would have lost your IP. If on the other hand you licence your IP to another business, you are in ultimate control and can stipulate how the IP should be used and when it has to be returned. You can also stipulate that the IP be returned to you if the business goes into liquidation or on the happening of certain events.




Copyright


What is it?

Copyright is the exclusive right to use and reproduce in public any material you have created if it falls into one of the following categories:

i) Written work such as books, plays film scripts, web content, articles, essays, professional opinions, tables, compilations and databases;

ii)Artistic works such as paintings, drawings, photos, maps, charts, plan, diagrams etc;

iii)sound recordings;

iv)Films, music and broadcasts; or

v) computer programs.

Why is it important?

Copyright arises automatically when you create the work so there is no need to register copyright to own a work that you have created. You should be wary of any person that asks you to pay them to register your copyright in a work that you have created as it will be a scam.

Businesses as well as individuals can own copyright. Copyright usually lasts for 70 years.

You can buy someone’s copyright via a document called a Deed of assignment or give them a licence to use your copyright. As a general rule if an employee creates a work in the course of their employment their employer (ie the business ) will own the work.

However, if the work in question is not part of the agreed duties of the employee the employee will own the work. To ensure that copyright work created by employees is owned by the business you should include appropriate intellectual property clauses in your employment contracts.

Risks

If you commission a piece of work from a freelancer the copyright in the work will belong to the freelancer unless the parties have agreed otherwise. It is important to ensure that the position on ownership of the copyright in writing before work starts to ensure that the business owns the copyright in the work produced by the freelancer.





Business Relationships

Joint Venture Agreement


What is it?

This agreement is needed when two or more parties decide to engage in a business collaboration to deal with a particular project. There are two main types of joint ventures:

i) A contractual joint venture is a contract between two parties who are looking to work together on a commercial project and pool their resources but do not want to create a separate legal entity such as a joint venture company or an LLP.(eg two businesses collaborating to bid for a contract or carry out research and development) . The collaboration will be generally be short term or for a defined period and will be of restricted scope with a well-defined purpose.

ii)A corporate joint venture is a contract between two parties looking to work together on a commercial project where they will both set up a separate company (“a joint venture company”) separate from their current operations, own shares in it, have representatives from each of the companies sitting on its board and or want their company to have limited liability for the debts and obligations of the joint venture. This type of joint venture is usually suitable if you will be collaboration on a longer term project and or your collaboration will be more risky and complex and therefore justifies the time and effort of setting up a separate company.




Manufacturing Agreement


What is it?

This agreement is needed if you want to employ the services of another company an individual to manufacture goods/products for you for your business. The agreement should cover a number of key areas including manufacture of the goods, materials, specification, quality control, packaging, storage, confidentiality, data protection, insurance, pricing, payment, delivery, title and risk, intellectual property, disputes, force majeure, service of notices, liability and indemnity clauses.




Memorandum of Understanding


What is it?

An MOU is a pre-contract, non-binding document setting out the key terms agreed by parties who intend to enter into a binding contract. It is also known as Heads of Terms, a Letter of Intent or a Term Sheet. It is a useful tool when two or more parties intend to enter into a future contract and want to identify, describe and agree, without it being contractually binding, the terms to be further negotiated and then recorded in a contractually binding contract.

There will occasionally be statements in a MOU which are exceptions to the general approach that a MOU is not binding : this will occur if the parties put in statements which the MOU expressly states are to be of legally binding effect until a definitive contract is signed. If that is the case those statements will generally be binding.

Why is it important?

An MOU is useful to set out the progress made during negotiations, reduce the potential for misunderstandings, indicate the major issues which still need to be resolved and make it clear what the parties intend when they enter into the contract.

Risks

The disadvantage of a MOU is that it can take up a considerable amount of time and may distract the parties from working on negotiating a full and detailed binding contract. There have been occasions when the parties to a proposed commercial arrangement never actually agree or sign a definite contract and have gone on to implement their deal based only on the MOU. This creates a very uncertain legal position which may lead to disputes and legal problems.




Agency Agreement


What is it?

The term “agent” is often used as shorthand in a business or legal context to mean a person authorised to act for or on behalf of another who is sometimes called the “principal” As a business you need to be able to distinguish whether or not a particular arrangement amounts to a commercial agency rather than another kind of agency or relationship. This is vital if you are to understand the various legal obligations, duties and liabilities that you owe your contractors/ agents and vice versa.

There are different types of individuals and companies which describe themselves as “agents”. These include for instance – commercial agents, sales agents. Employment agents, escrow agents etc.

A commercial agent is a kind of sales agent whose relationship with their principal is largely governed by the Commercial Agents (Council Directive) Regulations 1993 whereas the relationship between any other type of sales and their principal is largely governed by the common law and not by the Regulations. A “commercial agent” is defined by the Regulations as a “…self-employed intermediary who has continuing authority to negotiate the sale or purchase of goods on behalf of their principal or to negotiate and conclude such transactions on behalf of and in the name of that principal”.

Risks

All commercial agency arrangements must comply with the Commercial Agents Regulations 1993. In accordance with the European Withdrawal Act 2018( ad subject to the terms of any final Brexit deal) the Regulations will remain in force post-Brexit.In contrast a sales agent is a freelance self-employed individual or contractor who may or may not work for numerous clients.

You need an Agency Agreement if you want to appoint a third party to act on your behalf, marketing and selling your products and services – generally in exchange for commission on any sales.

An agency agreement sets out the terms and conditions of the relationship, the commission or fees the notice period and any exclusivity rights.

Other ways in which a business can expand without considerable outlay are via a distributorship and a franchise. In contrast to a distributorship, an agent earns commission on sales but does not pay for the goods, own the goods or set the sale price charged to the customer.




Referral Agreement


What is it?

A referral agreement is used where, in order to obtain more customers and sales and widen Business A’s customer base or sell into a new market, a supplier of goods or services (Business A) wishes to engage another person or business (Individual B or Business B) to effect an introduction/referral of new customers to Business A in return for which the agent receives a fee for the introduction/referral itself or for the introduction/referral where it results in a sale within a stated period after the introduction/referral. It is also known as an Introduction agreement. Examples of referrers/introducers are agents who introduce a seller of a business to a potential buyer or who introduce a potential investor to a business.

Why is it important?

If a business colleague is referring work to you or you are the referrer you should get a referral agreement that sets out the terms of your agreement. This will help avoid problems. A referral agreement can also be used where an e-commerce website wishes to increase its sales by allowing other websites to refer customers to them in return for a commission on sales obtained through such referrals. The fees can be either a fixed fee or percentage basis with payment when the referral is made or upon the first transaction or both.

The fees and payment clause can be drafted so that if the refer fails to introduce any new business they will not get a fee.There are specific referral agreements for the introduction of clients for financial services eg investment advice and insurance products.




Licensing Agreement


What is it?

There are numerous types of licensing agreements eg IP licensing agreement eg a trademark licence agreement, a licence to occupy property, a software licence agreement etc.A software licence agreement is an agreement between a software licensor (generally a software developer and/or owner) and licensee who will be using the licensed software in the course of a business or personally.

Why is it important?

We always recommend that our clients get a licensing agreement if for example they want to give a person or another business the right to use their technology, software or any other type of intellectual property. A software licence will set out what the user may or may not do with a piece of software thereby helping developers ensure that they maximise returns on their investments, restrict others from free use of their creative and inventive work and product software that remains stable across a broad range of computer systems.




End User Licence Agreement


What is it? This is a licence agreement between a software provider and a user where software is distributed en-masse through retailers or electronically eg Microsoft and people who use its software. The different types of end-user licences include a Web Wrap software licence (designed for use with software that is distributed electronically via download ) Click Wrap Licence (designed for use with software that can be distributed electronically via download or on physical media such as a CD or DVD-Rom, Shrink Wrap Licence (designed for use in or on the packaging of software that is distributed on physical media such as a CD or DVD-Rom).




Service Level Agreement


What is it?

Businesses often seek to obtain services from other businesses for various reasons. In some cases, a simple service agreement is all that is needed especially where the services in question are to be provided over a short term.However, in some cases a long-term relationship and the need for service consistency is essential. In such cases a business owner may prefer to enter into a Service Level Agreement with the service provider.

Why is it important?

Commonly used in the IT & Technology industries, but also applicable in other areas of business especially where large-scale or complex services are involved Service Level Agreements set out the services to be provided under a contract and also sets out the levels of performance to which those services must be provided. Detailed provisions govern the monitoring of the performance of the services and the agreement.

Risks

The service provider is thereby incentivised to consistently provide services in line with the agreed performance levels. If it fails to meet the agreed service levels it is subject to penalties. Service level agreements are preferable to standard service agreements as they contain much more detail, enhanced clarity and accountability over and above standard service agreements.




Partnership agreement


What is it?

There are 2 main types of partnership agreements:

An unlimited partnership – This is a relationship between two or more parties carrying on business together to make a profit. It is usually referred to as a “partnership” or a “general partnership” to distinguish it from other types of partnership such as a limited liability partnership. A partnership can arise by law even if there is no agreement in writing and even if the parties did not intend to create a partnership. An unlimited partnership is not a separate legal entity unlike a company or a limited liability partnership. Therefore, its partners have unlimited liability for the partnership’s debts.

A limited liability partnership – Unlike an unlimited partnership a limited liability partnership (LLP) requires the establishment of a separate corporate body through which the collaboration will be conducted. The partners will have limited liability in the same way as shareholders in a company. The partners will usually sign a member’s agreement setting out how the LLP will be run.




LLP agreement


What is it? This agreement applies when you have a limited liability partnership. Unlike an unlimited partnership a limited liability partnership (LLP) requires the establishment of a separate corporate body through which the collaboration will be conducted. Why is it important? The partners will have limited liability in the same way as shareholders in a company. The partners will usually sign a member’s agreement (LLP Agreement) setting out how the LLP will be run.




Distribution agreement


What is it?

A distributor buys goods from a supplier to sell on to customers. They can earn a profit margin based on the “mark-up” they add to the original sale price. A Distributorship agreement is an agreement whereby the manufacturer appoints the distributor on a “sole” or “non-exclusive” basis) to resell the manufacturer’s products in a particular territory/ies. In this case, the ownership of the goods is transferred to the distributor prior to the marketing and sale of the goods which means that the distributor may hold stocks of goods which they pay for and own – they therefore bear the risk as to whether they can resell the goods.

There are different types of distribution agreements eg exclusive, sole and selective distribution agreements. Business relationships can sour if based on verbal agreements. Protect your rights by ensuring you have a written distribution agreement.




Model release Form


What is it?

A signed Model Release Form protects your profit margin and your copyright.

Whether you work in a marketing business graphic design or are a commercial vlogger or blogger you need to ensure that any photographs that you use in your business has a properly signed release form. Whilst you do not generally need written permission to take photos, if you take photos and wish to publish the photos on the internet or in any other way or if you are starting a photography business you can protect yourself from any liability or legal proceedings by using a Model Release Form or Letter.

A Model Release Form is the contract between the photographer or User and the “model” (i.e. the subject or owner of the image or photograph). Designed to protect both parties it specifies the ways in which the images or models can or cannot be used (eg for advertising, to make prints, post on social media etc), the media formats, the use or not of the model’s name, the model’s rights (or not) to inspect the end product before publication and the expiry (or not) of the release.

Why is it important?

A Model Release Form is not about obtaining permission to take photographs – it is about obtaining signed consent to publish the photographs for commercial purposes. Whilst it is generally okay to take pictures of a person or people in a public place without written permission if you want to use that photo for specific commercial purposes eg to promote a product on the internet or elsewhere it is best to be safe and get a signed release form from the “model” or owner of the “model”.

Risks

But do get legal advice before you use a release form template as it may need adapting to fit your particular needs.And remember! If you want to use images for a purpose not originally agreed, you MUST get further signed consent.




Sales agency agreement


What is it?

If you are a business selling products you may decide to employ the services of a sales agent. A sales agent is a freelance self-employed business or contractor who might or might not work for several clients. The term “sales agent” includes a “commercial agent” but it is usual to distinguish the two forms of agency by referring to someone as a sales agent only if they are not a “commercial agent” as the legal position of a “commercial agent” differs substantially from other forms of “sales agency”.

The business that owns the products will be called the “Principal” and the sales agent will be called the “Agent”. The sales agent is paid commission only and so is motivated to make as many sales as possible to maximise their income.Central to the relationship between a business and their sales agent will be the “Agency Agreement”. The Sales Agency agreement will set out the product the agent will be selling, where the agent will be selling those products, how the sales are to take place, commission payable on all sales and the key rights and responsibilities of the parties.

Why is it important?

The use of sales agents as opposed to an employed sales team has a number of benefits for the business (i.e. the “Principal”) since commission is only payable on achieved sales, there are no fixed employment costs, and the agent will often already have a network of contacts ie established customer base, will know the market in their area and will have credibility with their customer base.




Sub-contracting agreement


What is it?

Many business contracts allow one or both parties to sub-contract all or part of their obligations under a contract. This can be done via a letter termed a “Notice of Intention to Sub-contract” from the main contractor to the other party to the main contract or via a formal “Sub-contracting” agreement.

Where a “Notice of intention to sub-contract” letter is used, the main contractor (ie sender of the letter) would inform the other party to the contract (ie the recipient of the letter) that the main contractor intends to subcontract certain of their obligations under a contract and will provide details of the subcontractor(s) to whom the obligations will be sub-contracted, a detailed description of the obligations to be sub-contracted with cross-references to the relevant parts of the Contract agreement between the main contractor and the other party to the contract agreement.

The recipient will also be reminded that they are not a party to the sub-contract and that the main contractor will remain their primary contact person and will also remain liable for any acts of omissions of the subcontractors.

As an option, the main contractor may also decide to enter into a formal “Sub-contracting” agreement with the sub-contractor and send a copy of this together with a letter to the sub-contractor and to the other party to the main contract.




Franchise Agreement


What is it?

Franchising your business lets you licence your business model to companies or individual in particular geographical areas and allows you to increase your profits while maintaining a significant degree of control over your brand. A Franchise agreement is an agreement under which the owner of a business grants a licence or licences to others (the “franchisees”) to operate that business in a particular area within the UK or internationally either on a “sole” or “non-exclusive” basis, for a fee therefore spreading their corporate identity and products or services without the expense of setting up new establishments.

All franchisees will use a common identity including the name, trademarks, goodwill, other intellectual property and or products of the franchisor. The franchisor will also provide a “Quality Manual” which in effect is a rule book setting out all the relevant detail needed for the successful day-to-day running of the franchised business eg minimum standards and insurance requirements. The agreement will usually include a confidentiality clause protecting all commercially sensitive information and trade secrets from unauthorised disclosure thereby protecting the interests of the franchisor.

Why is it important?

Franchising has benefits for the franchisor and the franchisee. The franchisor can grow its business without having to open, staff and manage new premises or branches itself whilst the franchisee can manage his/her own business which has been already tested by the franchisor and has access to the franchisor’s experience and expertise.

McDonalds and Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) operate their own restaurants and food outlets but also grant franchises to others to operate McDonalds and KFC businesses using their logos with McDonalds and Kentucky Fried Chicken exercising tight quality control over the restaurants, their location, food, health and safety etc.





Managing licenses


Running an online business


Protecting your IP


Business Relationships


Writing a business plan


Protecting your IP

Trademark (UK, EU, US, China)


What is it?

One of the best ways of protecting your business name, brand and logo from being copied is to register a trademark. A trademark is a distinctive sign eg name, brand, logo or tagline (or a combination of these) used by a business to distinguish its goods and or services from those sold by another business and to identify its business as the source of those goods and services.

In the UK, trademarks are granted by the UK Intellectual Property Office (UK IPO) Registering a trademark increases the protection it receives and stops others from using it.

You may be able to register a trademark over

  1. words (eg the trademark “Nandos”)
  2. pictures and words (eg the Pure Business Law trademark).
  3. slogans (eg the Lidl strap line “Big on quality, Lidl on price”)
  4. colours (eg the Cadbury Dairy Milk purple as owned by Kraft ).
  5. sounds (eg the Match of the Day theme song played when their logo appears at the beginning of football matches) and
  6. Logos (eg the Mac OS logo);
  7. 3D shapes (eg the Pepsi cola bottle shape)
Why is it important?

Registering a name or a logo gives you the following three benefits:

  1. Allows you to object if someone else applies to register ay name or logo that is similar to your trademark for the same of similar goods or services. This protection does not cover an application to use the same name or branding for a different type of business. For instance if you register “Fast-Sports” for a trade mark for selling sports cars, no one could register “Fast-Spots” for anything to do with selling cars but they may be able to register it as a trade mark for a dry-cleaning business because that has nothing to do with cars.
  2. If another business tries to use the same or similar branding on similar goods or services thereby infringing your trademark you can take legal proceedings to stop them.
  3. Your business’s goodwill and reputation have commercial value so registering a trademark is an easy way to protect your hard work and creativity.

Registering a trademark gives you the exclusive right to use it for 10 years, after which you must make an application to renew it to the Intellectual Property Office (IPO). Their website is at www.ipo.gov.uk.

You can register your trademarks in the UK, the EU and or internationally. All registrations last for 10years and are renewable indefinitely in further 10-year periods. The most suitable registration for your brand will depend on where you do business eg UK, EU or internationally.

Risks

If you do not register your name, brand or logo as a trademark you will not be able to easily stop other people using your trademark and you may end up allowing other businesses to profit from your hard work.




Patent (Worldwide)


What is it?

Protect your invention through a patent. A patent gives you an exclusive right over a novel invention that you have created. It gives you the exclusive right to use and reproduce your invention and stop people copying your invention without your permission. For instance, only Apple can make and sell Apple phones.

In the UK, patents are granted by the UK Intellectual Property Office (UK IPO) To have a patent over something you have created, you must register it at the IPO. Patents generally last for up to twenty years.

You can only patent a novel invention and cannot patent something that is already in the public domain. This means that your invention must be new (i.e. you cannot patent something which already exists eg a literary work, method of medical treatment, a diagnosis, scientific theory or a discovery) . You also cannot patent something which is already the subject of a patent application pre-dating your application. This means that you must carry out extensive market research examining trade journals and academic papers relevant to your industry market and searching for patents and patent applications on the patent registers worldwide. Obtaining a patent is expensive and time consuming. You should enlist the help of a professional eg lawyer or patent agent before starting an application for a patent.

Why is it important?

Should I register my invention as a patent?

Yes, you should if you believe that you have created a novel product or process which is so important to your business that you wish to pay a patent application fee to prevent others from using it.

Risks

Registering your invention as a patent ensures that:

  1. You can prevent others using your product or process if they intend to use it for commercial purposes.
  2. You can profit from your patent by only permitting certain people to use it for commercial purposes and only on condition that they pay you or give you a percentage of the profits they make from using your patent.

Risks

If you do not register your invention as a patent, you will not be able to easily stop other people copying your ideas and you may end up allowing other businesses to profit from your hard work.

You can use free online databases to search for patents eg Ipsum the UK IPO’s search facility, the Patents Journal (for UK applications that have been filed but not yet published), Espacenet – the European Patents Office’s (EPO’s) free database for worldwide patents including UK patents and Patentscope – the World Intellectual Property Organisation’s (WIPO’s ) free database for worldwide patents including UK patents. Note that these databases may not be up to date.

As an alternative you may prefer to use professional search services such as :

  1. The PATLIB (patent library) centre
  2. A Patent attorney through the Chartered Institute of Patent Attorneys at www. cipa.org.uk




IP Assignment Agreement


What is it? An IP assignment agreement transfers rights and ownership in an IP created by one person to someone else or to a business. It can be used to transfer rights in a trademark, patent, logo, designs or any other IP. Why is it important? An IP assignment agreement is important when a business is sold, and the founder created intellectual property before becoming a part of the company or a company employs a someone whether consultant or employee to do some work.




Registering Designs


What is it?

Register your design to stop someone else from using it.

A design right is a right that you have which can protect your original design from being copied by someone else.There are two different types of design rights – registered and unregistered design rights which can protect the look or appearance of a product from being copied.

Why is it important?

Design rights can exist in computer icons, logos, graphic designs, packaging and clothing. The rights do not arise by reference to the particular product but rather in the shape or look of either the whole of the product or part of that product. For instance, a registered design right in a motif used on a book will be infringed if someone else uses the same design motif on a duvet cover.

In the UK, design registrations are granted by the UK Intellectual Property Office (UK IPO).

Risks

Even if you do not register your design, it will still be automatically protected as an unregistered design right. However this right is more limited right because it only protects you against unauthorised copying and does not prevent other people creating similar designs independently.

For businesses in the UK these unregistered design rights arise automatically in the UK and the EU for some designs under both UK and EU law if the relevant criteria are met. In the UK, unregistered design rights arise as soon as the relevant designs are recorded in some way eg in a drawing and in the UK as soon as they are made available to the public. However, the protection granted differs slightly in each jurisdiction. For instance in the UK unregistered design rights will automatically protect either the shape or configuration of the whole or part of an article for up to 15 years, whereas in the EU unregistered design rights will automatically protect not only the appearance of the whole or part of any industrial or handicraft product resulting from its features but also its lines, shape, texture, contours and materials but only for up to 3 years.

You should therefor keep a watching brief and consider whether such a right has arisen as soon as you believe that either you or your employees (in the course of their employment) have created an original design.

Brexit

The UK and the EU have agreed that there will be an implementation period (ie transition period) from the date the UK left the EU i.e. 31 January 2020 until 31 December 2020 or a later date if the transition period is extended. During this period there will be no changes to unregistered design rights.

UK unregistered design rights

UK unregistered design rights will continue after the transition period and provide up to 15 years of protection. However, after the transition period the UK Government has advised that only UK residents or businesses incorporated in the UK will be eligible for UK registered designs.

EU unregistered design rights

From the end of the transition period unregistered design rights in the EU (ie unregistered Community designs) will no longer be valid in the IK. The government has advised that it will immediately replace the unregistered Community design rights with UK unregistered design rights ( to be known as UK continuing unregistered design rights) and which will offer protection in the EU and UK for the rest of the three year terms previously attached to the unregistered Community design right. This means you will continue to be protected in the EU and UK for unregistered Community designs that existed before the end of the transition period.

If you are concerned about how to protect your unregistered design rights in the UK and EU after the transition period please contact our IP lawyers for further advice on 01234 938089.




Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA)/Letter of confidentiality


What is it?

This agreement protects confidential information belonging to your business including IP and other information which you do not want to be made public.

Why is it important?

It is important to have an NDA in place before sharing any confidential or sensitive information in business meetings with people with whom you intend to do business eg investors, prospective co-founders, suppliers, consultants and the like. A letter of confidentiality is similar to a non-disclosure agreement. The party disclosing confidential information imposes restrictions as to the use of this confidential information to the party receiving it.

Risks

If you do not have the required safeguards in place to protect your intellectual property during business meetings or negotiations you may have your designs, inventions or work stolen or copied by the person with whom you are negotiating. This could be disastrous for your business.




one-way confidentiality agreement


What is it? A one-way Confidentiality agreement is similar to a non-disclosure agreement but imposes restrictions as to the use of this confidential information only on one party.




Assignment of intellectual property


What is it?

An IP assignment agreement transfers rights and ownership in an IP created by one-person eg trademark, patent, logo, designs or any other IP to someone else or to a business.

Why is it important?

An IP assignment agreement is important when a business is sold, and the founder created intellectual property before becoming a part of the company or a company employs a someone whether consultant or employee to do some work. If you assign IP rights to another business, you are transferring ownership of the IP.

It is more common to licence intellectual property rights than to assign them in business. Licensing allows a third party to have rights over the IP and do certain acts with the IP that they would not otherwise have been able to do but you keep ownership of the IP. You can limit the licence to a certain area eg the UK, Middle East, Africa etc or to a certain period of time eg 1 year, 2 years etc.

Risks

If for example you assign your IP to a business and it fails, you would have lost your IP. If on the other hand you licence your IP to another business, you are in ultimate control and can stipulate how the IP should be used and when it has to be returned. You can also stipulate that the IP be returned to you if the business goes into liquidation or on the happening of certain events.




Copyright


What is it?

Copyright is the exclusive right to use and reproduce in public any material you have created if it falls into one of the following categories:

i) Written work such as books, plays film scripts, web content, articles, essays, professional opinions, tables, compilations and databases;

ii)Artistic works such as paintings, drawings, photos, maps, charts, plan, diagrams etc;

iii)sound recordings;

iv)Films, music and broadcasts; or

v) computer programs.

Why is it important?

Copyright arises automatically when you create the work so there is no need to register copyright to own a work that you have created. You should be wary of any person that asks you to pay them to register your copyright in a work that you have created as it will be a scam.

Businesses as well as individuals can own copyright. Copyright usually lasts for 70 years.

You can buy someone’s copyright via a document called a Deed of assignment or give them a licence to use your copyright. As a general rule if an employee creates a work in the course of their employment their employer (ie the business ) will own the work.

However, if the work in question is not part of the agreed duties of the employee the employee will own the work. To ensure that copyright work created by employees is owned by the business you should include appropriate intellectual property clauses in your employment contracts.

Risks

If you commission a piece of work from a freelancer the copyright in the work will belong to the freelancer unless the parties have agreed otherwise. It is important to ensure that the position on ownership of the copyright in writing before work starts to ensure that the business owns the copyright in the work produced by the freelancer.





HR Policies

Terms and conditions for supply of services to business customers


What is it? Terms and conditions set out the rules and specifications which apply in every supply of services that a seller makes and helps to make everyone aware of their rights and obligations from the outset. Why is it important? Make sure you protect your business interests with professionally prepared terms and conditions. When supplying services to a business your terms and conditions should cover issues such as timing and termination of supply, orders, specifications, obligations, pricing, payment, intellectual property, confidentiality, warranties, liability and termination.




Terms and conditions for sale of goods to business customers


What is it? Terms and conditions set out the rules and specifications which apply in every sale of goods that a seller makes and helps to make everyone aware of their rights and obligations from the outset. Why is it important? When selling goods to a business your terms and conditions should cover the nature of products to be sold, orders, delivery, pricing, payment, risk, warranties, defects, liability and confidentiality.




Heads of terms (HOTs)


What is it? This is similar to a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)s, Term sheet or Letter of intent. The heads of terms set out the key terms agreed by the parties before entering a business transaction. It is not contractually binding. Heads of Terms are usually set out in a letter or document setting out the key terms agreed by parties who intend to enter a binding contract. It is also known as Letter of Intent, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) or a Term Sheet. It is a useful tool when two or more parties intend to enter a future contract and want to identify, describe and agree, without it being contractually binding, the terms to be further negotiated and then recorded in a contractually binding contract. There will occasionally be statements in heads of terms which are exceptions to the general approach that heads of terms are not binding: this will occur if the parties put in statements which heads of terms expressly state are to be of legally binding effect until a definitive contract is signed. If that is the case those statements will generally be binding. Why is it important? Heads of terms are useful to set out the progress made during negotiations, reduce the potential for misunderstandings, indicate the major issues which still need to be resolved and make it clear what the parties intend when they enter into the contract. The disadvantage of Heads of terms is that it can take up a considerable amount of time and may distract the parties from working on negotiating a full and detailed binding contract. Risks There have been occasions when the parties to a proposed commercial arrangement never actually agree or sign a definite contract and have gone on to implement their deal based only on the Heads of terms. This creates a very uncertain legal position which may lead to disputes and legal problems.




Letter of intent (LOI)


What is it? A Letter of Intent is a pre-contract, non-binding document setting out the key terms agreed by parties who intend to enter into a binding contract. It is also known as Heads of Terms, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) or a Term Sheet. It is a useful tool when two or more parties intend to enter into a future contract and want to identify, describe and agree, without it being contractually binding, the terms to be further negotiated and then recorded in a contractually binding contract. There will occasionally be statements in a letter of intent which are exceptions to the general approach that a letter of intent is not binding: this will occur if the parties put in statements which the letter of intent expressly states are to be of legally binding effect until a definitive contract is signed. If that is the case those statements will generally be binding. Why is it important? A letter of intent is useful to set out the progress made during negotiations, reduce the potential for misunderstandings, indicate the major issues which still need to be resolved and make it clear what the parties intend when they enter into the contract. The disadvantage of a letter of intent is that it can take up a considerable amount of time and may distract the parties from working on negotiating a full and detailed binding contract. Risks There have been occasions when the parties to a proposed commercial arrangement never actually agree or sign a definite contract and have gone on to implement their deal based only on the letter of intent. This creates a very uncertain legal position which may result in disputes and legal problems.




Invoices


What is it? An invoice is a statement setting out the goods and or services that have been supplied by a seller to a buyer and the money owed for those goods and or services. It is created by a seller or supplier to request payment for goods sold and or services provided. It is also called a bill. Why is it important? It identifies the trading partners, specifies the terms of the deal and provides information on the payment figure, the available methods of payment and the payment terms i.e. the maximum amount of time that a buyer had to pay for the goods and or services that they have purchased from the seller.




Sales of goods agreements





Purchase order


What is it? A purchase order is prepared by a buyer when the buyer orders goods or services from a seller. The purchase order will indicate the type of goods, quantity of goods and the price the buyer is willing to pay for the products and or services.

Once the seller accepts the purchase order it becomes a legally binding contract as the seller has agreed to sell the goods and or services at the prices put forward by the buyer. The seller will then issue an invoice to the buyer based on the purchase order.

Why is it important?

Purchase orders are important for businesses as it is instrumental in tracking expenditure, makes orders easier to track, helps avoid audit problems and provides contractual legal protection for the buyer and the supplier.

Alongside a purchase order system, it is vital that a company has strong credit management practices to safeguard cash flow from bad debts and late payment.

A strong debt collection process is vital to ensure payment is made when the goods or services have been delivered.

Invoice promptly and accurately and chase up with reminders. If a customer will not pay or ignores payment requests take action – Appoint a debt collection agency, take debt recovery action through the courts or pass the debt to a solicitor.

Pure Business Law has experienced debt collection lawyers who can assist you with debt recovery.




Services agreement


What is it?

A Service agreement also known as a Service contract or Contract for Services is a written agreement between a service provider and a customer setting out agreed terms for the supply of services. The terms should include details of the services to be provided, location of provision of the services, payment. Limitation of liability clause, tools or materials to be used, termination of the agreement, ownership of intellectual property clause and dispute resolution clauses.

Why is it important?

A services agreement is required when a business wants to engage another business to supply services. If your business is the service provider, you should use a service contract whenever you are hired by a customer to complete a service. If you are the customer and the service provider does not supply the contract, you can use a Service agreement to ensure that the terms of the service relationship are clear.

Having a services agreement will ensure that the parties to the contract understand their obligations and will protect the positions of both businesses in the event of termination of the contract or legal proceedings.





Managing licenses


Running an online business


Protecting your IP


Business Relationships


Writing a business plan


Starting an online business

Cookie Policy


What is it? A cookie is a small text file that that is stored on a website user’s computer to collect information. Why is it important? If you have cookies on your website you should have a cookie policy that informs users to your website what the cookies do, why you are collecting the information and how they can turn off cookies within their computer browser. Risks You must also get their consent and the consent must be clearly given.




Terms of Business


What is it? Your Terms of Business set out the terms and conditions on which you conduct your business and is the contract between you and your customer. Why is it important? Written terms and conditions of business are important especially when there is a dispute between your business and a customer or supplier. Written terms of business will clarify the scope of your services or the goods you agreed to sell or supply and certainty as to the agreed price, payment method, guarantees, warranties, remedies of the buyer if there is a dispute. Risks When selling goods and services online you must comply with certain legal requirements including the distance selling regulations.




Commission Linking Agreement


What is it? If you are linking your website to another website in order to share commission with the other website owner or to benefit from extra sales you need a Website Commission Linking Agreement.




Consent Notices


What is it? The law provides that if your website is based in the EU or if you are targeting customers in the EU and your site uses one or more cookies you need to display a cookie consent notice.

To comply with the law your need to do three things

  1. Let users to your website know that you are using cookies.

  2. Provide a link where they can learn more about how you use the data you gather.

  3. Provide a way for your website users to consent to the use of cookies.

Consent can be explicit opt-in consent and implied consent.

For explicit consent, users have to click a button, select a checkbox or complete some other specific activity to opt in to the use of cookies. The most common way to do this is to display a banner at the top or bottom of your website with a link to your Privacy policy and a button to consent to the use of cookies and hide the banner.

For implied consent a clear notice must be provided, and the user must be made aware that a specific action will be understood to be implied consent to the use of cookies. One way that implied consent is obtained is by displaying a prominent cookie notice that ends with a statement like “By continuing to use this site you agree to the use of cookies”.

The law applies whether a user is on a smartphone, tablet, a laptop, computer or other device. So when you set up your cookie notice you must ensure that the notice appears and functions well on all devices. There are also plugins for Cookie consent notices.




GDPR Compliance


What is it? The Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) regulates the processing of personal data by companies in the UK, specifying, for example, that data must be kept accurate and secure. A data protection policy is a statement of how you handle personal information given to you by your customers. The Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations set out a variety of rules which apply to the use of email marketing campaigns and regulates the use of cookies. Pure Business Law can assist you with all your data compliance matters.




Website Terms and Conditions for Sale of goods to consumers


What is it? Your Terms of Business or Terms and Conditions sets out the rights and obligations of the buyer and the seller in any sale of goods. Standard terms and conditions for the sale of goods help to make each party to the contract (whether a business or consumer) aware of their rights and obligations from the start. Why is it important? If you are dealing with a consumer there is a considerable amount of legislation eg the Consumer Rights Act 2015 aimed at protecting consumers which must be taken into account when preparing your terms and conditions. Make sure you do things right when creating your terms and conditions.




Website Terms and Conditions for supply of services to Consumers


What is it? Your Terms of Business or Terms and Conditions sets out the rights and obligations of the buyer and the seller in any supply of services. Standard terms and conditions for the supply of services help to make each party to the contract (whether a business or consumer) aware of their rights and obligations from the start. Why is it important? If you are dealing with a consumer there is a considerable amount of legislation eg the Consumer Rights Act 2015 aimed at protecting consumers which must be taken into account when preparing your terms and conditions. Make sure you do things right when creating your terms and conditions.




Email footer and disclaimer


What is it? An email footer sets out information required by law about limited companies and limited liability partnerships. The Companies Act 1985 requires all business emails from a private or public limited company to include the company’s registered name, registered number, place of registration and its registered office address.

Why is it important?

An email disclaimer is a notice or warning added to an email designed to protect the email sender from breaches of confidentiality, contractual claims. Virus propagation and employee liability. An email disclaimer is optional.




Website Terms of Use of Online Terms of Use


What is it?

Your Website terms of use set out the legal rights and obligations between you and users of your website. Even if you do not sell goods on your website, you should have a written set of terms and conditions to cover all permitted and prohibited uses of your website, including any registration requirements, linked websites, disclaimers, limitation of liability and associated subscription fees.




Privacy policy


What is it? A website privacy policy is a statement of how you handle personal information given to you by your customers. When you trade on the internet you will most likely be handling personal information because you keep records of your customers or website users. Why is it important? A website privacy policy helps build trust in your website and informs your visitors how their personal data is protected. In the UK the main legislation governing the collection, processing and distribution of personal data is the Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).




Website Terms and Conditions


What is it? If you have a website it is a good idea to create website terms and conditions as it helps to ensure that customers and users know how a website can and cannot be used. They set out the legal rights and obligations between you and users of your website. They cover the acceptable uses of the website, prohibited use of the website, registration, password and security, linked websites, disclaimers and limitation of liability.





Managing licenses


Running an online business


Protecting your IP


Business Relationships


Writing a business plan


Buying & Selling Goods & Services

Terms and conditions for supply of services to business customers


What is it? Terms and conditions set out the rules and specifications which apply in every supply of services that a seller makes and helps to make everyone aware of their rights and obligations from the outset. Why is it important? Make sure you protect your business interests with professionally prepared terms and conditions. When supplying services to a business your terms and conditions should cover issues such as timing and termination of supply, orders, specifications, obligations, pricing, payment, intellectual property, confidentiality, warranties, liability and termination.




Terms and conditions for sale of goods to business customers


What is it? Terms and conditions set out the rules and specifications which apply in every sale of goods that a seller makes and helps to make everyone aware of their rights and obligations from the outset. Why is it important? When selling goods to a business your terms and conditions should cover the nature of products to be sold, orders, delivery, pricing, payment, risk, warranties, defects, liability and confidentiality.




Heads of terms (HOTs)


What is it? This is similar to a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)s, Term sheet or Letter of intent. The heads of terms set out the key terms agreed by the parties before entering a business transaction. It is not contractually binding. Heads of Terms are usually set out in a letter or document setting out the key terms agreed by parties who intend to enter a binding contract. It is also known as Letter of Intent, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) or a Term Sheet. It is a useful tool when two or more parties intend to enter a future contract and want to identify, describe and agree, without it being contractually binding, the terms to be further negotiated and then recorded in a contractually binding contract. There will occasionally be statements in heads of terms which are exceptions to the general approach that heads of terms are not binding: this will occur if the parties put in statements which heads of terms expressly state are to be of legally binding effect until a definitive contract is signed. If that is the case those statements will generally be binding. Why is it important? Heads of terms are useful to set out the progress made during negotiations, reduce the potential for misunderstandings, indicate the major issues which still need to be resolved and make it clear what the parties intend when they enter into the contract. The disadvantage of Heads of terms is that it can take up a considerable amount of time and may distract the parties from working on negotiating a full and detailed binding contract. Risks There have been occasions when the parties to a proposed commercial arrangement never actually agree or sign a definite contract and have gone on to implement their deal based only on the Heads of terms. This creates a very uncertain legal position which may lead to disputes and legal problems.




Letter of intent (LOI)


What is it? A Letter of Intent is a pre-contract, non-binding document setting out the key terms agreed by parties who intend to enter into a binding contract. It is also known as Heads of Terms, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) or a Term Sheet. It is a useful tool when two or more parties intend to enter into a future contract and want to identify, describe and agree, without it being contractually binding, the terms to be further negotiated and then recorded in a contractually binding contract. There will occasionally be statements in a letter of intent which are exceptions to the general approach that a letter of intent is not binding: this will occur if the parties put in statements which the letter of intent expressly states are to be of legally binding effect until a definitive contract is signed. If that is the case those statements will generally be binding. Why is it important? A letter of intent is useful to set out the progress made during negotiations, reduce the potential for misunderstandings, indicate the major issues which still need to be resolved and make it clear what the parties intend when they enter into the contract. The disadvantage of a letter of intent is that it can take up a considerable amount of time and may distract the parties from working on negotiating a full and detailed binding contract. Risks There have been occasions when the parties to a proposed commercial arrangement never actually agree or sign a definite contract and have gone on to implement their deal based only on the letter of intent. This creates a very uncertain legal position which may result in disputes and legal problems.




Invoices


What is it? An invoice is a statement setting out the goods and or services that have been supplied by a seller to a buyer and the money owed for those goods and or services. It is created by a seller or supplier to request payment for goods sold and or services provided. It is also called a bill. Why is it important? It identifies the trading partners, specifies the terms of the deal and provides information on the payment figure, the available methods of payment and the payment terms i.e. the maximum amount of time that a buyer had to pay for the goods and or services that they have purchased from the seller.




Sales of goods agreements





Purchase order


What is it? A purchase order is prepared by a buyer when the buyer orders goods or services from a seller. The purchase order will indicate the type of goods, quantity of goods and the price the buyer is willing to pay for the products and or services.

Once the seller accepts the purchase order it becomes a legally binding contract as the seller has agreed to sell the goods and or services at the prices put forward by the buyer. The seller will then issue an invoice to the buyer based on the purchase order.

Why is it important?

Purchase orders are important for businesses as it is instrumental in tracking expenditure, makes orders easier to track, helps avoid audit problems and provides contractual legal protection for the buyer and the supplier.

Alongside a purchase order system, it is vital that a company has strong credit management practices to safeguard cash flow from bad debts and late payment.

A strong debt collection process is vital to ensure payment is made when the goods or services have been delivered.

Invoice promptly and accurately and chase up with reminders. If a customer will not pay or ignores payment requests take action – Appoint a debt collection agency, take debt recovery action through the courts or pass the debt to a solicitor.

Pure Business Law has experienced debt collection lawyers who can assist you with debt recovery.




Services agreement


What is it?

A Service agreement also known as a Service contract or Contract for Services is a written agreement between a service provider and a customer setting out agreed terms for the supply of services. The terms should include details of the services to be provided, location of provision of the services, payment. Limitation of liability clause, tools or materials to be used, termination of the agreement, ownership of intellectual property clause and dispute resolution clauses.

Why is it important?

A services agreement is required when a business wants to engage another business to supply services. If your business is the service provider, you should use a service contract whenever you are hired by a customer to complete a service. If you are the customer and the service provider does not supply the contract, you can use a Service agreement to ensure that the terms of the service relationship are clear.

Having a services agreement will ensure that the parties to the contract understand their obligations and will protect the positions of both businesses in the event of termination of the contract or legal proceedings.





Managing licenses


Running an online business


Protecting your IP


Business Relationships


Writing a business plan


Letting a commercial property

Cookie Policy


What is it? A cookie is a small text file that that is stored on a website user’s computer to collect information. Why is it important? If you have cookies on your website you should have a cookie policy that informs users to your website what the cookies do, why you are collecting the information and how they can turn off cookies within their computer browser. Risks You must also get their consent and the consent must be clearly given.




Terms of Business


What is it? Your Terms of Business set out the terms and conditions on which you conduct your business and is the contract between you and your customer. Why is it important? Written terms and conditions of business are important especially when there is a dispute between your business and a customer or supplier. Written terms of business will clarify the scope of your services or the goods you agreed to sell or supply and certainty as to the agreed price, payment method, guarantees, warranties, remedies of the buyer if there is a dispute. Risks When selling goods and services online you must comply with certain legal requirements including the distance selling regulations.




Commission Linking Agreement


What is it? If you are linking your website to another website in order to share commission with the other website owner or to benefit from extra sales you need a Website Commission Linking Agreement.




Consent Notices


What is it? The law provides that if your website is based in the EU or if you are targeting customers in the EU and your site uses one or more cookies you need to display a cookie consent notice.

To comply with the law your need to do three things

  1. Let users to your website know that you are using cookies.

  2. Provide a link where they can learn more about how you use the data you gather.

  3. Provide a way for your website users to consent to the use of cookies.

Consent can be explicit opt-in consent and implied consent.

For explicit consent, users have to click a button, select a checkbox or complete some other specific activity to opt in to the use of cookies. The most common way to do this is to display a banner at the top or bottom of your website with a link to your Privacy policy and a button to consent to the use of cookies and hide the banner.

For implied consent a clear notice must be provided, and the user must be made aware that a specific action will be understood to be implied consent to the use of cookies. One way that implied consent is obtained is by displaying a prominent cookie notice that ends with a statement like “By continuing to use this site you agree to the use of cookies”.

The law applies whether a user is on a smartphone, tablet, a laptop, computer or other device. So when you set up your cookie notice you must ensure that the notice appears and functions well on all devices. There are also plugins for Cookie consent notices.




GDPR Compliance


What is it? The Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) regulates the processing of personal data by companies in the UK, specifying, for example, that data must be kept accurate and secure. A data protection policy is a statement of how you handle personal information given to you by your customers. The Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations set out a variety of rules which apply to the use of email marketing campaigns and regulates the use of cookies. Pure Business Law can assist you with all your data compliance matters.




Website Terms and Conditions for Sale of goods to consumers


What is it? Your Terms of Business or Terms and Conditions sets out the rights and obligations of the buyer and the seller in any sale of goods. Standard terms and conditions for the sale of goods help to make each party to the contract (whether a business or consumer) aware of their rights and obligations from the start. Why is it important? If you are dealing with a consumer there is a considerable amount of legislation eg the Consumer Rights Act 2015 aimed at protecting consumers which must be taken into account when preparing your terms and conditions. Make sure you do things right when creating your terms and conditions.




Website Terms and Conditions for supply of services to Consumers


What is it? Your Terms of Business or Terms and Conditions sets out the rights and obligations of the buyer and the seller in any supply of services. Standard terms and conditions for the supply of services help to make each party to the contract (whether a business or consumer) aware of their rights and obligations from the start. Why is it important? If you are dealing with a consumer there is a considerable amount of legislation eg the Consumer Rights Act 2015 aimed at protecting consumers which must be taken into account when preparing your terms and conditions. Make sure you do things right when creating your terms and conditions.




Email footer and disclaimer


What is it? An email footer sets out information required by law about limited companies and limited liability partnerships. The Companies Act 1985 requires all business emails from a private or public limited company to include the company’s registered name, registered number, place of registration and its registered office address.

Why is it important?

An email disclaimer is a notice or warning added to an email designed to protect the email sender from breaches of confidentiality, contractual claims. Virus propagation and employee liability. An email disclaimer is optional.




Website Terms of Use of Online Terms of Use


What is it?

Your Website terms of use set out the legal rights and obligations between you and users of your website. Even if you do not sell goods on your website, you should have a written set of terms and conditions to cover all permitted and prohibited uses of your website, including any registration requirements, linked websites, disclaimers, limitation of liability and associated subscription fees.




Privacy policy


What is it? A website privacy policy is a statement of how you handle personal information given to you by your customers. When you trade on the internet you will most likely be handling personal information because you keep records of your customers or website users. Why is it important? A website privacy policy helps build trust in your website and informs your visitors how their personal data is protected. In the UK the main legislation governing the collection, processing and distribution of personal data is the Data Protection Act 2018 and the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).




Website Terms and Conditions


What is it? If you have a website it is a good idea to create website terms and conditions as it helps to ensure that customers and users know how a website can and cannot be used. They set out the legal rights and obligations between you and users of your website. They cover the acceptable uses of the website, prohibited use of the website, registration, password and security, linked websites, disclaimers and limitation of liability.





Managing licenses


Running an online business


Protecting your IP


Business Relationships


Writing a business plan


Sale and Purchase of Commercial Property

Datenschutzerklärung Allgemein


Daten werden im Rahmen der gesetzlichen Vorschriften geschützt. Nachfolgend finden Sie Informationen, welche Daten während Ihres Besuchs erfasst und wie diese genutzt werden. Diese Erklärungen gelten ausdrücklich auch für die anderen onlinebasierten Angebote der 4 Seasons Marketing GmbH einschließlich deren Angebote auf Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Issuu, BigCartel, etc.




Grundsätzliche Angaben zur Datenverarbeitung


Wir erheben, verarbeiten und nutzen personenbezogene Daten der Nutzer nur unter Einhaltung der einschlägigen Datenschutzbestimmungen. Das bedeutet, die Daten der Nutzer werden nur beim Vorliegen einer gesetzlichen Erlaubnis oder Vorliegen einer Einwilligung gem. Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. DSGVO verwendet.
Wir treffen organisatorische, vertragliche und technische Sicherheitsmaßnahmen entsprechend dem Stand der Technik, um sicher zu stellen, dass die Vorschriftender Datenschutzgesetze eingehalten werden und um damit die durch uns verwalteten Daten gegen zufällige oder vorsätzliche Manipulationen, Verlust, Zerstörung oder gegen den Zugriff unberechtigter Personen zu schützen.




Erhebung, Verarbeitung und Nutzung und Weitergabe personenbezogener Daten


Die personenbezogenen Daten der Nutzer werden für die Ausführung unserer Dienste-, Service- und Nutzerleistungen verwendet. Die Weitergabe der Daten an Servicedienstleister erfolgt auf Basis gesetzlicher Bestimmungen – hierfür wurden entsprechende Verträge mit den Dienstleistern abgeschlossen, welche die Dienstleister zur Einhaltung der Datenschutzbestimmungen verpflichten. Bei Kontaktaufnahme mit uns, z.B. per Kontaktformular, werden die Angaben zwecks Bearbeitung der Anfrage sowie für den Fall, dass Anschlussfragen entstehen, gespeichert. Die personenbezogenen Daten werden gelöscht, sofern sie nicht mehr erforderlich sind oder der Löschung keine gesetzlichen Aufbewahrungspflichten entgegen stehen.




Zugriffsdaten


Personenbezogene Daten werden von uns über unser Internetangebot nur im technisch notwendigen Umfang erhoben (Name der abgerufenen Datei, Datum und Uhrzeit des Abrufs, übertragene Datenmenge, Meldung über erfolgreichen Abruf, Browsertyp nebst Version, das Betriebssystem des Nutzers, Referrer URL (die zuvor besuchte Seite) und der anfragende Provider). Diese Daten können von der uns nicht bestimmten Personen zugeordnet werden und werden auch nicht mit Daten aus anderen Datenquellen zusammengeführt.




Kommentare im Blog


Wenn Sie einen Kommentar im Blog abgeben, wird Ihre IP-Adresse gespeichert. Das erfolgt zu unserer Sicherheit, falls jemand in Kommentaren widerrechtliche Inhalte schreibt (Beleidigungen, verbotene politische Propaganda, etc.). In diesem Fall könnten wir selbst für den Kommentar belangt werden und sind daher an der Identität des Kommentarverfassers interessiert. Diese Kommentar-IP-Adressen werden jedoch gelöscht, sobald wir die Kommentare gelesen haben. Das erfolgt in der Regel innerhalb weniger Stunden. Die Nachfolgekommentare können abonniert werden. Sie erhalten eine Bestätigungsemail, um zu überprüfen, ob Sie der Inhaber der eingegebenen Emailadresse sind. Sie können laufende Kommentarabonnements jederzeit abbestellen. Die Bestätigungsemail wird Hinweise dazu enthalten. Bei der Anmeldung und deren Bestätigung werden die IP-Adresse mit dem Zeitpunkt gespeichert, um im Zweifelsfall die Anmeldung nachweisen zu können.




Cookies


Cookies sind Informationen, die von unserem Webserver oder Webservern Dritter an die Web-Browser der Nutzer übertragen und dort für einen späteren Abruf gespeichert werden. Bei Cookies kann es sich um kleine Dateien oder sonstige Arten der Informationsspeicherung handeln. Über den Einsatz von Cookies im Rahmen pseudonymer Reichweitenmessung werden die Nutzer im Rahmen dieser Datenschutzerklärung informiert. Die Betrachtung dieses Onlineangebotes ist auch unter Ausschluss von Cookies möglich. Falls die Nutzer nicht möchten, dass Cookies auf ihrem Rechner gespeichert werden, werden sie gebeten die entsprechende Option in den Systemeinstellungen ihres Browsers zu deaktivieren. Gespeicherte Cookies können in den Systemeinstellungen des Browsers gelöscht werden. Der Ausschluss von Cookies kann zu Funktionseinschränkungen dieses Onlineangebotes führen.




Google Analytics


Wir setzen Google Analytics, einen Webanalysedienst der Google Inc. („Google“) ein. Google verwendet Cookies. Die durch das Cookie erzeugten Informationen über Benutzung des Onlineangebotes durch die Nutzer werden in der Regel an einen Server von Google in den USA übertragen und dort gespeichert. Google wird diese Informationen in unserem Auftrag benutzen, um die Nutzung unseres Onlineangebotes durch die Nutzer auszuwerten, um Reports über die Aktivitäten innerhalb dieses Onlineangebotes zusammenzustellen und um weitere mit der Nutzung dieses Onlineangebotes und der Internetnutzung verbundene Dienstleistungen uns gegenüber zu erbringen. Dabei können aus den verarbeiteten Daten pseudonyme Nutzungsprofile der Nutzer erstellt werden. Wir setzen Google Analytics nur mit aktivierter IP-Anonymisierung ein. Das bedeutet, die IP-Adresse der Nutzer wird von Google innerhalb von Mitgliedstaaten der Europäischen Union oder in anderen Vertragsstaaten des Abkommens über den Europäischen Wirtschaftsraum gekürzt. Nur in Ausnahmefällen wird die volle IP-Adresse an einen Server von Google in den USA übertragen und dort gekürzt. Die von dem Browser des Nutzers übermittelte IP-Adresse wird nicht mit anderen Daten von Google zusammengeführt. Die Nutzer können die Speicherung der Cookies durch eine entsprechende Einstellung ihrer Browser-Software verhindern; die Nutzer können darüber hinaus die Erfassung der durch das Cookie erzeugten und auf ihre Nutzung des Onlineangebotes bezogenen Daten an Google sowie die Verarbeitung dieser Daten durch Google verhindern, indem sie das unter dem folgenden Link verfügbare Browser-Plugin herunterladen und installieren:http://tools.google.com/dlpage/gaoptout?hl=de. Weitere Informationen zur Datennutzung zu Werbezwecken durch Google, Einstellungs- und Widerspruchsmöglichkeiten erfahren Sie auf den Webseiten von Google:https://www.google.com/intl/de/policies/privacy/partners („Datennutzung durch Google bei Ihrer Nutzung von Websites oder Apps unserer Partner“), http://www.google.com/policies/technologies/ads („Datennutzung zu Werbezwecken“), http://www.google.de/settings/ads („Informationen verwalten, die Google verwendet, um Ihnen Werbung einzublenden“) und http://www.google.com/ads/preferences („Bestimmen Sie, welche Werbung Google Ihnen zeigt“).




Newsletter Mailchimp


Hinweise zum Newsletter und Einwilligungen Mit den nachfolgenden Hinweisen klären wir Sie über die Inhalte unseres Newsletters sowie das Anmelde-, Versand- und das statistische Auswertungsverfahren sowie Ihre Widerspruchsrechte auf. Indem Sie unseren Newsletter abonnieren, erklären Sie sich mit dem Empfang und den beschriebenen Verfahren einverstanden. Inhalt des Newsletters Wir versenden Newsletter, E-Mails und weitere elektronische Benachrichtigungen mit werblichen Informationen (nachfolgend „Newsletter“) nur mit der Einwilligung der Empfänger oder einer gesetzlichen Erlaubnis. Sofern im Rahmen einer Anmeldung zum Newsletter dessen Inhalte konkret umschrieben werden, sind sie für die Einwilligung der Nutzer maßgeblich. Im Übrigen enthalten unsere Newsletter Informationen über Rechtsthemen, insbesondere aus dem Bereich des Marketingrechts, Datenschutzes sowie unserer Kanzlei (hierzu können insbesondere Hinweise auf Blogbeiträge, Vorträge oder Workshops, unsere Leistungen oder Onlineauftritte gehören). Double-Opt-In und Protokollierung Die Anmeldung zu unserem Newsletter erfolgt in einem sog. Double-Opt-In-Verfahren. D.h. Sie erhalten nach der Anmeldung eine E-Mail, in der Sie um die Bestätigung Ihrer Anmeldung gebeten werden. Diese Bestätigung ist notwendig, damit sich niemand mit fremden E-Mailadressen anmelden kann. Die Anmeldungen zum Newsletter werden protokolliert, um den Anmeldeprozess entsprechend den rechtlichen Anforderungen nachweisen zu können. Hierzu gehört die Speicherung des Anmelde- und des Bestätigungszeitpunkts, als auch der IP-Adresse. Einsatz des Versanddienstleisters „MailChimp“ Der Versand der Newsletter erfolgt mittels „MailChimp„, einer Newsletterversandplattform des US-Anbieters Rocket Science Group, LLC, 675 Ponce De Leon Ave NE #5000, Atlanta, GA 30308, USA. Die E-Mail-Adressen unserer Newsletterempfänger, als auch deren weitere, im Rahmen dieser Hinweise beschriebenen Daten, werden auf den Servern von MailChimp in den USA gespeichert. MailChimp verwendet diese Informationen zum Versand und zur Auswertung der Newsletter in unserem Auftrag. Des Weiteren kann MailChimp nach eigenen Informationen diese Daten zur Optimierung oder Verbesserung der eigenen Services nutzen, z.B. zur technischen Optimierung des Versandes und der Darstellung der Newsletter oder für wirtschaftliche Zwecke, um zu bestimmen aus welchen Ländern die Empfänger kommen. MailChimp nutzt die Daten unserer Newsletterempfänger jedoch nicht, um diese selbst anzuschreiben oder gibt die Daten an Dritte weiter. Wir vertrauen auf die Zuverlässigkeit und die IT- sowie Datensicherheit von MailChimp. MailChimp ist unter dem US-EU-Datenschutzabkommen „Privacy Shield“ Privacy Shieldzertifiziert und verpflichtet sich damit die EU-Datenschutzvorgaben einzuhalten. Des Weiteren haben wir mit MailChimp ein „Data-Processing-Agreement“ abgeschlossen. Dabei handelt es sich um einen Vertrag, in dem sich MailChimp dazu verpflichtet, die Daten unserer Nutzer zu schützen, entsprechend dessen Datenschutzbestimmungen in unserem Auftrag zu verarbeiten und insbesondere nicht an Dritte weiter zu geben. Die Datenschutzbestimmungen von MailChimp können Sie hier einsehen. Anmeldedaten Um sich für den Newsletter anzumelden, reicht es aus, wenn Sie Ihre E-Mailadresse angeben. Weitere Daten helfen uns das Angebot besser auf unsere Kunden zuzuschneiden, sind jedoch ausdrücklich nicht erforderlich und freiwillig. Statistische Erhebung und Analysen Die Newsletter enthalten einen sog. „web-beacon“, d.h. eine pixelgroße Datei, die beim Öffnen des Newsletters von dem Server von MailChimp abgerufen wird. Im Rahmen dieses Abrufs werden zunächst technische Informationen, wie Informationen zum Browser und Ihrem System, als auch Ihre IP-Adresse und Zeitpunkt des Abrufs erhoben. Diese Informationen werden zur technischen Verbesserung der Services anhand der technischen Daten oder der Zielgruppen und ihres Leseverhaltens anhand derer Abruforte (die mit Hilfe der IP-Adresse bestimmbar sind) oder der Zugriffszeiten. Zu den statistischen Erhebungen gehört ebenfalls die Feststellung, ob die Newsletter geöffnet werden, wann sie geöffnet werden und welche Links geklickt werden. Diese Informationen können aus technischen Gründen zwar den einzelnen Newsletterempfängern zugeordnet werden. Es ist jedoch weder unser Bestreben, noch das von MailChimp, einzelne Nutzer zu beobachten. Die Auswertungen dienen uns viel mehr dazu, die Lesegewohnheiten unserer Nutzer zu erkennen und unsere Inhalte auf sie anzupassen oder unterschiedliche Inhalte entsprechend den Interessen unserer Nutzer zu versenden. Online-Aufruf und Datenmanagement Es gibt Fälle, in denen wir die Newsletterempfänger auf die Webseiten von MailChimp leiten. Z.B. enthalten unsere Newsletter einen Link, mit dem die Newsletterempfänger die Newsletter online abrufen können (z.B. bei Darstellungsproblemen im E-Mailprogramm). Ferner können Newsletterempfänger ihre Daten, wie z.B. die E-Mailadresse nachträglich korrigieren. Ebenso ist die Datenschutzerklärung von MailChimp nur auf deren Seite abrufbar. In diesem Zusammenhang wiesen wir darauf hin, dass auf den Webseiten von MailChimp Cookies eingesetzt und damit personenbezogene Daten durch MailChimp, deren Partnern und eingesetzten Dienstleistern (z.B. Google Analytics) verarbeitet werden. Auf diese Datenerhebung haben wir keinen Einfluss. Weitere Informationen können Sie der Datenschutzerklärung von MailChimp entnehmen. Wir weisen Sie zusätzlich auf die Widerspruchsmöglichkeiten in die Datenerhebung zu Werbezwecken auf den Webseiten http://www.aboutads.info/choices/ und http://www.youronlinechoices.com/ (für den Europäischen Raum) hin. Kündigung/Widerruf Sie können dem Empfang unseres Newsletters jederzeit kündigen, d.h. Ihre Einwilligungen widerrufen. Damit erlöschen gleichzeitig Ihre Einwilligungen in dessen Versand via MailChimp und die statistischen Analysen. Ein getrennter Widerruf des Versandes via MailChimp oder der statistischen Auswertung ist leider nicht möglich. Einen Link zur Kündigung des Newsletters finden Sie am Ende eines jeden Newsletters.




Google-Re/Marketing-Services


Wir nutzen die Marketing- und Remarketing-Dienste (kurz „Google-Marketing-Services”) der Google Inc., 1600 Amphitheatre Parkway, Mountain View, CA 94043, USA, („Google“). Die Google-Marketing-Services erlauben uns Werbeanzeigen für und auf unserer Website gezielter anzuzeigen, um Nutzern nur Anzeigen zu präsentieren, die potentiell deren Interessen entsprechen. Falls einem Nutzer z.B. Anzeigen für Produkte angezeigt werden, für die er sich auf anderen Webseiten interessiert hat, spricht man hierbei vom „Remarketing“. Zu diesen Zwecken wird bei Aufruf unserer und anderer Webseiten, auf denen Google-Marketing-Services aktiv sind, unmittelbar durch Google ein Code von Google ausgeführt und es werden in die Website sog. (Re)marketing-Tags (unsichtbare Grafiken oder Code, auch als „Web Beacons“ bezeichnet) in die Webseite eingebunden. Mit deren Hilfe wird auf dem Gerät der Nutzer ein individuelles Cookie, d.h. eine kleine Datei abgespeichert (statt Cookies können auch vergleichbare Technologien verwendet werden). Die Cookies können von verschiedenen Domains gesetzt werden, unter anderem von google.com, doubleclick.net, invitemedia.com, admeld.com, googlesyndication.com oder googleadservices.com. In dieser Datei wird vermerkt, welche Webseiten der Nutzer aufgesucht, für welche Inhalte er sich interessiert und welche Angebote er geklickt hat, ferner technische Informationen zum Browser und Betriebssystem, verweisende Webseiten, Besuchszeit sowie weitere Angaben zur Nutzung des Onlineangebotes. Es wird ebenfalls die IP-Adresse der Nutzer erfasst, wobei wir im Rahmen von Google-Analytics mitteilen, dass die IP-Adresse innerhalb von Mitgliedstaaten der Europäischen Union oder in anderen Vertragsstaaten des Abkommens über den Europäischen Wirtschaftsraum gekürzt und nur in Ausnahmefällen ganz an einen Server von Google in den USA übertragen und dort gekürzt wird. Die IP-Adresse wird nicht mit Daten des Nutzers innerhalb von anderen Angeboten von Google zusammengeführt. Die vorstehend genannten Informationen können seitens Google auch mit solchen Informationen aus anderen Quellen verbunden werden. Wenn der Nutzer anschließend andere Webseiten besucht, können ihm entsprechend seiner Interessen die auf ihn abgestimmten Anzeigen angezeigt werden. Die Daten der Nutzer werden im Rahmen der Google-Marketing-Services pseudonym verarbeitet, d.h. Google speichert und verarbeitet z.B. nicht den Namen oder die E-Mailadresse der Nutzer, sondern verarbeitet die relevanten Daten Cookie-bezogen innerhalb pseudonymer Nutzer-Profile. D.h. aus der Sicht von Google werden die Anzeigen nicht für eine konkret identifizierte Person verwaltet und angezeigt, sondern für den Cookie-Inhaber, unabhängig davon wer dieser Cookie-Inhaber ist. Dies gilt nicht, wenn ein Nutzer Google ausdrücklich erlaubt hat, die Daten ohne diese Pseudonymisierung zu verarbeiten. Die von Google-Marketing-Services über die Nutzer gesammelten Informationen werden an Google übermittelt und auf Googles Servern in den USA gespeichert. Zu den von uns eingesetzten Google-Marketing-Services gehört u.a. das Online-Werbeprogramm „Google AdWords“. Im Fall von Google AdWords, erhält jeder AdWords-Kunde ein anderes „Conversion-Cookie“. Cookies können somit nicht über die Websites von AdWords-Kunden nachverfolgt werden. Die mit Hilfe des Cookies eingeholten Informationen dienen dazu, Conversion-Statistiken für AdWords-Kunden zu erstellen, die sich für Conversion-Tracking entschieden haben. Die AdWords-Kunden erfahren die Gesamtanzahl der Nutzer, die auf ihre Anzeige geklickt haben und zu einer mit einem Conversion-Tracking-Tag versehenen Seite weitergeleitet wurden. Sie erhalten jedoch keine Informationen, mit denen sich Nutzer persönlich identifizieren lassen. Wir können auf Grundlage des Google-Marketing-Services „DoubleClick“ Werbeanzeigen Dritter einbinden. DoubleClick verwendet Cookies, mit denen Google und seinen Partner-Websites, die Schaltung von Anzeigen auf Basis der Besuche von Nutzern auf dieser Website bzw. anderen Websites im Internet ermöglicht wird. Wir können auf Grundlage des Google-Marketing-Services „AdSense“ Werbeanzeigen Dritter einbinden. AdSense verwendet Cookies, mit denen Google und seinen Partner-Websites, die Schaltung von Anzeigen auf Basis der Besuche von Nutzern auf dieser Website bzw. anderen Websites im Internet ermöglicht wird. Ferner können wird den „Google Tag Manager“ einsetzen, um die Google Analyse- und Marketing-Dienste in unsere Website einzubinden und zu verwalten. Weitere Informationen zur Datennutzung zu Marketingzwecken durch Google, erfahren Sie auf der Übersichtsseite:https://www.google.com/policies/technologies/ads, die Datenschutzrichtlinie von Google ist unter https://www.google.com/policies/privacy Wenn Sie der interessensbezogenen Werbung durch Google-Marketing-Services widersprechen möchten, können Sie die von Google gestellten Einstellungs- und Opt-Out-Möglichkeiten nutzen: http://www.google.com/ads/preferences.




Facebook Social Plugins


Unser Onlineangebot verwendet Social Plugins („Plugins“) des sozialen Netzwerkes facebook.com, welches von der Facebook Ireland Ltd., 4 Grand Canal Square, Grand Canal Harbour, Dublin 2, Irland betrieben wird („Facebook“). Die Plugins sind an einem der Facebook Logos erkennbar (weißes „f“ auf blauer Kachel, den Begriffen „Like“, „Gefällt mir“ oder einem „Daumen hoch“-Zeichen) oder sind mit dem Zusatz „Facebook Social Plugin“ gekennzeichnet. Die Liste und das Aussehen der Facebook Social Plugins kann hier eingesehen werden:https://developers.facebook.com/docs/plugins/. Wenn ein Nutzer eine Funktion dieses Onlineangebotes aufruft, die ein solches Plugin enthält, baut sein Gerät eine direkte Verbindung mit den Servern von Facebook auf. Der Inhalt des Plugins wird von Facebook direkt an das Gerät des Nutzers übermittelt und von diesem in das Onlineangebot eingebunden. Dabei können aus den verarbeiteten Daten Nutzungsprofile der Nutzer erstellt werden. Wir haben daher keinen Einfluss auf den Umfang der Daten, die Facebook mit Hilfe dieses Plugins erhebt und informieren die Nutzer daher entsprechend unserem Kenntnisstand. Durch die Einbindung der Plugins erhält Facebook die Information, dass ein Nutzer die entsprechende Seite des Onlineangebotes aufgerufen hat. Ist der Nutzer bei Facebook eingeloggt, kann Facebook den Besuch seinem Facebook-Konto zuordnen. Wenn Nutzer mit den Plugins interagieren, zum Beispiel den Like Button betätigen oder einen Kommentar abgeben, wird die entsprechende Information von Ihrem Gerät direkt an Facebook übermittelt und dort gespeichert. Falls ein Nutzer kein Mitglied von Facebook ist, besteht trotzdem die Möglichkeit, dass Facebook seine IP-Adresse in Erfahrung bringt und speichert. Laut Facebook wird in Deutschland nur eine anonymisierte IP-Adresse gespeichert. Zweck und Umfang der Datenerhebung und die weitere Verarbeitung und Nutzung der Daten durch Facebook sowie die diesbezüglichen Rechte und Einstellungsmöglichkeiten zum Schutz der Privatsphäre der Nutzer, können diese den Datenschutzhinweisen von Facebook entnehmen:https://www.facebook.com/about/privacy/. Wenn ein Nutzer Facebookmitglied ist und nicht möchte, dass Facebook über dieses Onlineangebot Daten über ihn sammelt und mit seinen bei Facebook gespeicherten Mitgliedsdaten verknüpft, muss er sich vor der Nutzung unseres Onlineangebotes bei Facebook ausloggen und seine Cookies löschen. Weitere Einstellungen und Widersprüche zur Nutzung von Daten für Werbezwecke, sind innerhalb der Facebook-Profileinstellungen möglich: https://www.facebook.com/settings?tab=ads oder über die US-amerikanische Seite http://www.aboutads.info/choices/ oder die EU Seite http://www.youronlinechoices.com/. Die Einstellungen erfolgen plattformunabhängig, d.h. sie werden für alle Geräte, wie Desktopcomputer oder mobile Geräte übernommen.




Verwendung der Twitter-Schaltflächen


Dieses Angebot nutzt die Schaltflächen des Dienstes Twitter. Diese Schaltflächen werden angeboten durch die Twitter Inc., 795 Folsom St., Suite 600, San Francisco, CA 94107, USA. Sie sind an Begriffen wie „Twitter“ oder „Folge“, verbunden mit einem stillisierten blauen Vogel erkennbar. Mit Hilfe der Schaltflächen ist es möglich einen Beitrag oder Seite dieses Angebotes bei Twitter zu teilen oder dem Anbieter bei Twitter zu folgen. Wenn ein Nutzer eine Webseite dieses Internetauftritts aufruft, die einen solchen Button enthält, baut sein Browser eine direkte Verbindung mit den Servern von Twitter auf. Der Inhalt des Twitter-Schaltflächen wird von Twitter direkt an den Browser des Nutzers übermittelt. Der Anbieter hat daher keinen Einfluss auf den Umfang der Daten, die Twitter mit Hilfe dieses Plugins erhebt und informiert die Nutzer entsprechend seinem Kenntnisstand. Nach diesem wird lediglich die IP-Adresse des Nutzers die URL der jeweiligen Webseite beim Bezug des Buttons mit übermittelt, aber nicht für andere Zwecke, als die Darstellung des Buttons, genutzt. Weitere Informationen hierzu finden sich in der Datenschutzerklärung von Twitter unter http://twitter.com/privacy.




Kontaktformular / CRM System


Bei der Kontaktaufnahme mit uns (per Kontaktformular oder E-Mail) als auch in der täglichen Arbeit werden die Angaben des Nutzers und Kunden zur Bearbeitung der Kontaktanfrage und deren Abwicklung gem. Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit. b) DSGVO verarbeitet. Die Angaben der Nutzer können in unserem Customer-Relationship-Management System („CRM System“) oder vergleichbarer Anfragenorganisation gespeichert werden. Wir setzen das CRM-System „Daylite“, des Anbieters Marcetcircle Inc., 30 Centurian Drive, Suite 201, Markham, Ontrario L3R8B8, Kanada, auf Grundlage unserer berechtigten Interessen (effiziente und schnelle Bearbeitung der Nutzeranfragen) ein. Hierzu haben wir mit Marketcircle einen Vertrag mit sog. Standardvertragsklauseln abgeschlossen, in denen sich Marketcircle zur Verarbeitung der Nutzerdaten nur entsprechend unseren Weisungen und zur Einhaltung des EU-Datenschutzniveaus verpflichtet.




Website Dienstleister


Unsere Website basiert auf der von der Firma Wix.com Inc. , 500 Terry A. Francois Boulevard, 6th Floor, San Francisco, CA, 94158 bereitgestellten Technik (Baukastensystem). Wir weisen darauf hin, dass wir als Nutzer des Systems keine Kenntnis vom Inhalt der übermittelten Daten sowie deren Nutzung durch Wix.com erhalten. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass Server, die durch Firmen in den USA betrieben werden nicht den europäischen Datenschutzbestimmungen unterliegen müssen. Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von Wix https://de.wix.com/about/privacy.




Akkreditierung Helfer und Media


Wir nutzen in unseren Kontaktformularen für Helfer und bei der Mediaakkreditierung den Service Unbounce. Dieser Service wird bereitgestellt durch Unbounce 400-401 West Georgia Street Vancouver, BC Canada V6B 5A1. Die Daten werden über eine API Schnittstelle an unseren Newsletter Service Mailchimp weitergeleitet (siehe Newsletter in dieser Datenschutzerklärung). Mit versenden des Helfer / Akkreditierungsantrags erhalten Sie eine Email mit der Aufforderung sich mit der Aufnahme in den entsprechenden Newsletter Verteiler einverstanden zu erklären. Die Aufnahme in den Newsletter Verteiler ist freiwillig und erleichtert uns die Arbeit ungemein, wenn Sie dieses sogenannte Double OptIn nicht bestätigen kann es sein, dass sie nicht alle Informationen erhalten. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass wir als Nutzer des Systems keine Kenntnis vom Inhalt der übermittelten Daten sowie deren Nutzung durch Wix.com erhalten. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass Server, die durch Firmen in den USA betrieben werden nicht den europäischen Datenschutzbestimmungen unterliegen müssen. Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von Unbounce https://unbounce.com/privacy/




Zeitmessung und Ergebnislisten


Auf unseren Seiten sind Funktionen des Dienstes Sportident eingebunden. Diese Funktionen werden angeboten durch die SPORTident GmbH Markt 14 99310 Arnstadt
Germany. Sie umfassen die Auswertung der Wettkämpfe und Darstellung der Ergebnislisten. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass eine Teilnahme an Wettkämpfen ohne Zeitmessung oder mit anonymisierter Zeitmessung nicht möglich ist. Wir verarbeiten Teilnehmerdaten wie in der Anmeldung angegeben zwecks Erfüllung unserer vertraglichen Verpflichtungen und Serviceleistungen gem. Art. 6 Abs. 1 lit b. DSGVO. Hierzu haben wir mit Sportident einen Vertrag mit sog. Standardvertragsklauseln abgeschlossen, in denen sich Sportident zur Verarbeitung der Nutzerdaten nur entsprechend unseren Weisungen und zur Einhaltung des EU-Datenschutzniveaus verpflichtet.
Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von Sportident: https://www.sportident.com/legal-information.html




Shopsysteme


Zum Verkauf von Merchandise Artikeln und Tickets beutzen wir teilweise das von der Firma Firma Wix.com Inc. , 500 Terry A. Francois Boulevard, 6th Floor, San Francisco, CA, 94158 bereitgestellten Shopsystem bzw. Bigcartel.com mit Sitz in Salt Lake City Utah USA. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass wir als Nutzer des Systems keine Kenntnis vom Inhalt der übermittelten Daten sowie deren Nutzung durch die Service Provider erhalten. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass Server, die durch Firmen in den USA betrieben werden nicht den europäischen Datenschutzbestimmungen unterliegen müssen. Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von Wix https://de.wix.com/about/privacybzw. Bigcartel https://help.bigcartel.com/privacy-policy.




Youtube Videos


Auf unseren Seiten sind Videos eingebunden, die auf der Videoplattform YouTube (mit Sitz in Califormia USA ) bereitgestellt werden. Wir nutzen diesen Service, um unsere Videos auf einer breiten Palette von Endgeräten und Browserversionen ohne Qualitätsverlust zur Verfügung zu stellen. Wenn Sie von diesem Angebot durch anklicken Gebrauch machen kann YouTube u.U. personenbezogene Daten erheben. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass wir als Anbieter der Seiten keine Kenntnis vom Inhalt der übermittelten Daten sowie deren Nutzung durch YouTube erhalten. Ferner wir u.U. eine Verbindung zum DoubleClick Werbenetzwerk aufgebaut. Außerdem informieren wir sie, dass Server, die durch Firmen in den USA betrieben werden nicht den europäischen Datenschutzbestimmungen unterliegen. Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von YouTube: https://policies.google.com/privacy?hl=de&gl=de




Instagram


Auf unseren Seiten sind Funktionen des Dienstes Instagram eingebunden. Diese Funktionen werden angeboten durch die Instagram Inc., 1601 Willow Road, Menlo Park, CA, 94025, USA integriert. Wenn Sie in Ihrem Instagram – Account eingeloggt sind können Sie durch Anklicken des Instagram – Buttons die Inhalte unserer Seiten mit Ihrem Instagram – Profil verlinken. Dadurch kann Instagram den Besuch unserer Seiten Ihrem Benutzerkonto zuordnen. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass Server, die durch Firmen in den USA betrieben werden nicht den europäischen Datenschutzbestimmungen unterliegen müssen. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass wir als Anbieter der Seiten keine Kenntnis vom Inhalt der übermittelten Daten sowie deren Nutzung durch Instagram erhalten.
Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von Instagram: https://help.instagram.com/519522125107875




Haftung für Inhalte


Als Diensteanbieter sind wir gemäß § 7 Abs.1 TMG für eigene Inhalte auf diesen Seiten nach den allgemeinen Gesetzen verantwortlich. Nach §§ 8 bis 10 TMG sind wir als Diensteanbieter jedoch nicht verpflichtet, übermittelte oder gespeicherte fremde Informationen zu überwachen oder nach Umständen zu forschen, die auf eine rechtswidrige Tätigkeit hinweisen. Verpflichtungen zur Entfernung oder Sperrung der Nutzung von Informationen nach den allgemeinen Gesetzen bleiben hiervon unberührt. Eine diesbezügliche Haftung ist jedoch erst ab dem Zeitpunkt der Kenntnis einer konkreten Rechtsverletzung möglich. Bei Bekanntwerden von entsprechenden Rechtsverletzungen werden wir diese Inhalte umgehend entfernen.




Haftung für Links


Unser Angebot enthält Links zu externen Webseiten Dritter, auf deren Inhalte wir keinen Einfluss haben. Deshalb können wir für diese fremden Inhalte auch keine Gewähr übernehmen. Für die Inhalte der verlinkten Seiten ist stets der jeweilige Anbieter oder Betreiber der Seiten verantwortlich. Die verlinkten Seiten wurden zum Zeitpunkt der Verlinkung auf mögliche Rechtsverstöße überprüft. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass Server, die durch Firmen in den USA betrieben werden nicht den europäischen Datenschutzbestimmungen unterliegen müssen. Wir weisen ferner darauf hin, dass wir als Anbieter der Seiten keine Kenntnis vom Inhalt der übermittelten Daten sowie deren Nutzung durch Dritte erhalten.Rechtswidrige Inhalte waren zum Zeitpunkt der Verlinkung nicht erkennbar. Eine permanente inhaltliche Kontrolle der verlinkten Seiten ist jedoch ohne konkrete Anhaltspunkte einer Rechtsverletzung nicht zumutbar. Bei Bekanntwerden von Rechtsverletzungen werden wir derartige Links umgehend entfernen.




Urheberrecht


Die durch die Seitenbetreiber erstellten Inhalte und Werke auf diesen Seiten unterliegen dem deutschen Urheberrecht. Die Vervielfältigung, Bearbeitung, Verbreitung und jede Art der Verwertung außerhalb der Grenzen des Urheberrechtes bedürfen der schriftlichen Zustimmung des jeweiligen Autors bzw. Erstellers. Downloads und Kopien dieser Seite sind nur für den privaten, nicht kommerziellen Gebrauch gestattet. Soweit die Inhalte auf dieser Seite nicht vom Betreiber erstellt wurden, werden die Urheberrechte Dritter beachtet. Insbesondere werden Inhalte Dritter als solche gekennzeichnet. Sollten Sie trotzdem auf eine Urheberrechtsverletzung aufmerksam werden, bitten wir um einen entsprechenden Hinweis. Bei Bekanntwerden von Rechtsverletzungen werden wir derartige Inhalte umgehend entfernen.




Widerrufsrecht Allgemein


Sie haben das Recht, binnen 14 Tagen ohne Angabe von Gründen diesen Vertrag zu widerrufen. Die Widerufsfrist beträgt vierzehn Tage ab dem Tag, an dem Sie oder ein von Ihnen benannter Dritter, der nicht der Beförderer ist, die Waren in Besitz genommen haben bzw. hat. Um Ihr Widerrufsrecht auszuüben, müssen Sie uns (SportPlus Marketing GmbH, Moriz-Seeler-Straße 5, 12489 Berlin, FAX: +49-30-6331474-29, E-Mail: info@notj.de) mittels einer eindeutigen Erklärung (z.B. ein mit der Post versandter Brief, Telefax oder E-Mail) über Ihren Entschluss, diesen Vertrag zu widerrufen, informieren. Tickets sind vom Widerrufsrecht ausgeschlossen. Zur Wahrung der Widerrufsfrist reicht es aus, dass Sie die Mitteilung über die Ausübung des Widerrufsrechts vor Ablauf der Widerrufsfrist absenden.




Rücktrittsrecht bei Tickets


Die SportPlus Marketing GmbH behält sich vor, bei offensichtlichen Preisirrtümern sowie im Falle der Unmöglichkeit der vermittelten Leistung und in Fällen höherer Gewalt vom Vertrag zurückzutreten. Im Falle der Nichtverfügbarkeit der vermittelten Leistung wird die SportPlus Marketing GmbH den Kunden unverzüglich informieren und die bereits erbrachten Zahlungen unverzüglich zurückerstatten. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass nach § 312 b Abs. 3 Nr. 6 BGB beim Verkauf von Eintrittskarten der § 312b keine Anwendung findet. Das heißt dem Kunden steht kein Widerrufsrecht zu und die Bestellung der Eintrittskarten ist nach der Bestätigung durch die SportPlus GmbH im Namen des Veranstalters bindend.




Gewinnspiel Teilnahmebedingungen


Veranstalter ist die SportPlus Marketing GmbH, Moriz-Seeler-Straße 5, 12489 Berlin, Deutschland. Die Teilnahme ist kostenlos und unabhängig von dem Erwerb von Waren oder Dienstleistungen. Mit der Teilnahme an dem Gewinnspiel akzeptiert der Benutzer diese Teilnahmebedingungen. Teilnahmeberechtigt sind Personen die bei der Teilnahme mindestens 16 Jahre alt sind. Teilnehmer des Gewinnspiels ist diejenige Person, der die Email-Adresse, die bei der Anmeldung zum Gewinnspiel angegeben worden ist, gehört. Es ist pro »Teilnehmer« nur eine Teilnahme möglich; die wiederholte Teilnahme kann je nach Ermessen von SportPlus Marketing GmbH den Verlust der Teilnahmeberechtigung zur Folge haben. Es werden nur die im Gewinnspiel näher beschriebenen Preise verlost. Die Auslosung findet nur unter den Teilnehmern statt, die eigenhändig sämtliche für die Teilnahme an dem Gewinnspiel auszufüllenden Eingabefelder vollständig, verständlich und richtig ausgefüllt haben. Das Gewinnspiel läuft bis zur der in der Ausschreibung angegeben Zeit. Der Gewinner des Preises wird zeitnah zur Verlosung per Email unter Verwendung der bei der Anmeldung gemachten weiteren Angaben benachrichtigt. Mit der Annahme des Preises willigt der Gewinner ein, dass sein Name und sein Foto von SportPlus Marketing GmbH und den preisstiftenden Partner zu Werbezwecken ohne Vergütung verwendet und veröffentlicht werden dürfen. Werden die Preise nicht zum vereinbarten Zeitpunkt abgeholt erlischt der Anspruch auf den Gewinn. Die Formalitäten zur Übergabe der Gewinne werden mit den Gewinnern individuell geklärt. Eine Barauszahlung, Auszahlung in Sachwerten oder Tausch der Gewinne ist nicht möglich. Die Preise sind nicht übertragbar. Der Gewinner akzeptiert notwendige Änderungen des Gewinns, die durch andere außerhalb des Einflussbereichs der am Gewinnspiel beteiligten Firmen liegenden Faktoren bedingt sind. Die Entscheidungen von SportPlus Marketing GmbH sind endgültig. Diesbezügliche Anfragen können nicht beantwortet werden. SportPlus Marketing GmbH behält sich das Recht vor, das Gewinnspiel ganz oder zeitweise auszusetzen, wenn irgendwelche Schwierigkeiten auftreten, die die Integrität des Gewinnspiels gefährden. SportPlus Marketing GmbH behält sich ferner das Recht vor, diese Teilnahmebedingungen auch unangekündigt zu ändern. Jegliche Schadenersatzverpflichtung von SportPlus GmbH und ihrer Organe, Angestellten und Erfüllungsgehilfen aus oder im Zusammenhang mit dem Gewinnspiel, gleich aus welchem Rechtsgrund, ist, soweit gesetzlich zulässig, auf Fälle von Vorsatz oder grober Fahrlässigkeit beschränkt. Die bei diesem Gewinnspiel von Ihnen gemachten Angaben werden zum Zwecke des Gewinnspiels verwendet. Mit dem zusätzlichen anklicken der Newsletter Optionen wird die Chance auf den Gewinn nicht erhöht. Diese Einwilligung zum Newsletter kann jederzeit per Abmeldelink im jeweiligen Newsletter widerrufen werden. Es gelten die AGB der SportPlus Marketing GmbH. Der Rechtsweg ist ausgeschlossen.




Übrige Einbindung von Diensten und Inhalten Dritter


Es kann vorkommen, dass innerhalb dieses Onlineangebotes Inhalte Dritter, wie zum Beispiel Videos von YouTube, Kartenmaterial von Google-Maps, RSS-Feeds oder Grafiken von anderen Webseiten eingebunden werden. Dies setzt immer voraus, dass die Anbieter dieser Inhalte (nachfolgend bezeichnet als „Dritt-Anbieter“) die IP-Adresse der Nutzer wahrnehmen. Denn ohne die IP-Adresse, könnten sie die Inhalte nicht an den Browser des jeweiligen Nutzers senden. Die IP-Adresse ist damit für die Darstellung dieser Inhalte erforderlich. Wir bemühen uns nur solche Inhalte zu verwenden, deren jeweilige Anbieter die IP-Adresse lediglich zur Auslieferung der Inhalte verwenden. Jedoch haben wir keinen Einfluss darauf, falls die Dritt-Anbieter die IP-Adresse z.B. für statistische Zwecke speichern. Soweit dies uns bekannt ist, klären wir die Nutzer darüber auf.




Rechte der Nutzer und Löschung von Daten


Nutzer haben das Recht, auf Antrag unentgeltlich Auskunft zu erhalten über die personenbezogenen Daten, die von uns über sie gespeichert wurden.
Zusätzlich haben die Nutzer das Recht auf Berichtigung unrichtiger Daten, Widerruf von Einwilligungen, Sperrung und Löschung ihrer personenbezogenen Daten sowie das Recht, im Fall der Annahme einer unrechtmäßigen Datenverarbeitung eine Beschwerde bei der zuständigen Aufsichtsbehörde einzureichen.
Die bei uns gespeicherten Daten werden gelöscht, sobald sie für ihre Zweckbestimmung nicht mehr erforderlich sind und der Löschung keine gesetzlichen Aufbewahrungspflichten entgegenstehen.




Änderungen der Datenschutzerklärung


Wir behalten uns vor, die Datenschutzerklärung zu ändern, um sie an geänderte Rechtslagen, oder bei Änderungen des Dienstes sowie der Datenverarbeitung anzupassen. Dies gilt jedoch nur im Hinblick auf Erklärungen zur Datenverarbeitung. Sofern Einwilligungen der Nutzer erforderlich sind oder Bestandteile der Datenschutzerklärung Regelungen des Vertragsverhältnisses mit den Nutzern enthalten, erfolgen die Änderungen nur mit Zustimmung der Nutzer. Die Nutzer werden gebeten sich regelmäßig über den Inhalt der Datenschutzerklärung zu informieren.




Sonstige Hinweise


Wir sind bemüht, Ihre personenbezogenen Daten durch Ergreifung aller technischen und organisatorischen Möglichkeiten so zu speichern, dass sie für Dritte nicht zugänglich sind. Bei der Kommunikation per E Mail kann die vollständige Datensicherheit nicht gewährleistet werden, so dass wir Ihnen bei vertraulichen Informationen den Postweg empfehlen. Die Mitarbeiter und die von uns beauftragten Dienstleistungsunternehmen sind von uns zur Verschwiegenheit und zur Einhaltung der Bestimmungen des Bundesdatenschutzgesetzes und sonstiger Datenschutzbestimmungen verpflichtet.




Verantwortliche Stelle im Sinne des Datenschutzrechts


4 Seasons Marketing GmbH Marko Manthey Bölschestraße 54 12587 Berlin Telefon: 030 63314740
Email: info@notj.de




Angaben gemäß §5 TMG


4 Seasons Marketing GmbH Bölschestraße 54 12587 Berlin Germany Vertreten durch: Marko Manthey, Jörg Hotzel
Kontakt:Telefon: +49 30 6331474-0 E-Mail: info(at)notj.de Registereintrag: Eintragung im Handelsregister
Registergericht: Amtsgericht Berlin Charlottenburg, Registernummer: HRB 162813 B
Verantwortlich für den Inhalt nach § 55 Abs. 2 RStV: Marko Manthey, Jörg Hotzel




SPORTRADAR


Auf unseren Seiten sind Videos eingebunden, die auf der Hostingplattform Sportradar (mit Sitz in Österreich ) bereitgestellt werden. Wir nutzen diesen Service, um unsere Videos auf einer breiten Palette von Endgeräten und Browserversionen ohne Qualitätsverlust zur Verfügung zu stellen. Wenn Sie von diesem Angebot durch anklicken Gebrauch machen kann Sportradar u.U. personenbezogene Daten erheben. Wir weisen darauf hin, dass wir als Anbieter der Seiten keine Kenntnis vom Inhalt der übermittelten Daten sowie deren Nutzung durch Sportradar erhalten. Ferner wird u.U. eine Verbindung zum DoubleClick Werbenetzwerk aufgebaut. Ausserdem informieren wir Sie, dass Server die Ausserhalb der Europäischen Union stehen u.U. nicht den Europäischen Datenschutzbestimmungen entsprechen können. Weitere Informationen hierzu finden Sie in der Datenschutzerklärung von Sportradar: https://www.sportradar.com/about-us/privacy/ und der Cookie Erklärung





Planning & Highways

Terms and conditions for supply of services to business customers


What is it? Terms and conditions set out the rules and specifications which apply in every supply of services that a seller makes and helps to make everyone aware of their rights and obligations from the outset. Why is it important? Make sure you protect your business interests with professionally prepared terms and conditions. When supplying services to a business your terms and conditions should cover issues such as timing and termination of supply, orders, specifications, obligations, pricing, payment, intellectual property, confidentiality, warranties, liability and termination.




Terms and conditions for sale of goods to business customers


What is it? Terms and conditions set out the rules and specifications which apply in every sale of goods that a seller makes and helps to make everyone aware of their rights and obligations from the outset. Why is it important? When selling goods to a business your terms and conditions should cover the nature of products to be sold, orders, delivery, pricing, payment, risk, warranties, defects, liability and confidentiality.




Heads of terms (HOTs)


What is it? This is similar to a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)s, Term sheet or Letter of intent. The heads of terms set out the key terms agreed by the parties before entering a business transaction. It is not contractually binding. Heads of Terms are usually set out in a letter or document setting out the key terms agreed by parties who intend to enter a binding contract. It is also known as Letter of Intent, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) or a Term Sheet. It is a useful tool when two or more parties intend to enter a future contract and want to identify, describe and agree, without it being contractually binding, the terms to be further negotiated and then recorded in a contractually binding contract. There will occasionally be statements in heads of terms which are exceptions to the general approach that heads of terms are not binding: this will occur if the parties put in statements which heads of terms expressly state are to be of legally binding effect until a definitive contract is signed. If that is the case those statements will generally be binding. Why is it important? Heads of terms are useful to set out the progress made during negotiations, reduce the potential for misunderstandings, indicate the major issues which still need to be resolved and make it clear what the parties intend when they enter into the contract. The disadvantage of Heads of terms is that it can take up a considerable amount of time and may distract the parties from working on negotiating a full and detailed binding contract. Risks There have been occasions when the parties to a proposed commercial arrangement never actually agree or sign a definite contract and have gone on to implement their deal based only on the Heads of terms. This creates a very uncertain legal position which may lead to disputes and legal problems.




Letter of intent (LOI)


What is it? A Letter of Intent is a pre-contract, non-binding document setting out the key terms agreed by parties who intend to enter into a binding contract. It is also known as Heads of Terms, a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) or a Term Sheet. It is a useful tool when two or more parties intend to enter into a future contract and want to identify, describe and agree, without it being contractually binding, the terms to be further negotiated and then recorded in a contractually binding contract. There will occasionally be statements in a letter of intent which are exceptions to the general approach that a letter of intent is not binding: this will occur if the parties put in statements which the letter of intent expressly states are to be of legally binding effect until a definitive contract is signed. If that is the case those statements will generally be binding. Why is it important? A letter of intent is useful to set out the progress made during negotiations, reduce the potential for misunderstandings, indicate the major issues which still need to be resolved and make it clear what the parties intend when they enter into the contract. The disadvantage of a letter of intent is that it can take up a considerable amount of time and may distract the parties from working on negotiating a full and detailed binding contract. Risks There have been occasions when the parties to a proposed commercial arrangement never actually agree or sign a definite contract and have gone on to implement their deal based only on the letter of intent. This creates a very uncertain legal position which may result in disputes and legal problems.




Invoices


What is it? An invoice is a statement setting out the goods and or services that have been supplied by a seller to a buyer and the money owed for those goods and or services. It is created by a seller or supplier to request payment for goods sold and or services provided. It is also called a bill. Why is it important? It identifies the trading partners, specifies the terms of the deal and provides information on the payment figure, the available methods of payment and the payment terms i.e. the maximum amount of time that a buyer had to pay for the goods and or services that they have purchased from the seller.




Sales of goods agreements





Purchase order


What is it? A purchase order is prepared by a buyer when the buyer orders goods or services from a seller. The purchase order will indicate the type of goods, quantity of goods and the price the buyer is willing to pay for the products and or services.

Once the seller accepts the purchase order it becomes a legally binding contract as the seller has agreed to sell the goods and or services at the prices put forward by the buyer. The seller will then issue an invoice to the buyer based on the purchase order.

Why is it important?

Purchase orders are important for businesses as it is instrumental in tracking expenditure, makes orders easier to track, helps avoid audit problems and provides contractual legal protection for the buyer and the supplier.

Alongside a purchase order system, it is vital that a company has strong credit management practices to safeguard cash flow from bad debts and late payment.

A strong debt collection process is vital to ensure payment is made when the goods or services have been delivered.

Invoice promptly and accurately and chase up with reminders. If a customer will not pay or ignores payment requests take action – Appoint a debt collection agency, take debt recovery action through the courts or pass the debt to a solicitor.

Pure Business Law has experienced debt collection lawyers who can assist you with debt recovery.




Services agreement


What is it?

A Service agreement also known as a Service contract or Contract for Services is a written agreement between a service provider and a customer setting out agreed terms for the supply of services. The terms should include details of the services to be provided, location of provision of the services, payment. Limitation of liability clause, tools or materials to be used, termination of the agreement, ownership of intellectual property clause and dispute resolution clauses.

Why is it important?

A services agreement is required when a business wants to engage another business to supply services. If your business is the service provider, you should use a service contract whenever you are hired by a customer to complete a service. If you are the customer and the service provider does not supply the contract, you can use a Service agreement to ensure that the terms of the service relationship are clear.

Having a services agreement will ensure that the parties to the contract understand their obligations and will protect the positions of both businesses in the event of termination of the contract or legal proceedings.





Managing licenses


Running an online business


Protecting your IP


Business Relationships


Writing a business plan


 
 
 

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Pure Business Law is the trading name for Pure Business Law Ltd-a private limited company registered in England & Wales with company registration number 10405413. Registered office and Principal place of business : Excel House, 3 Duke Street, Bedford. MK40 3HR. VAT number 265 5386 75.

 

 

Pure Business Law is authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA number 635679)- we are governed by the SRA's  professional rules which may be found at www.rules.sra.org.uk. A list of our directors is available on request.  The term "director" denotes a shareholder or director of the company or an employee or consultant who is a lawyer with equivalent standing and qualifications. Calls may be recorded for security and training purposes.

 

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