Problems &

Disagreements

Problems & Disagreements

 

Starting a business is an empowering yet daunting time. The start-up costs are generally high and the returns in the first few months are low or non-existent.

Here you will find advice on some of the key areas of concern when encountering a problem or disagreement. 

Manage your debt
Manage your debt

Take control.

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Recovering a debt
Recovering a debt

Get your money back fast.

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Reorganisation & Redundancies
Reorganisation & Redundancies

Preparation is key.

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Issues with employer
Issues with employer

Top tips for managing employee disputes.

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Commercial notices
Commercial notices

Get it right first time!

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Manage employee performance
Manage employee performance

Empower your team.

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Landlord & Tenant problems
Landlord & Tenant problems

Understanding your rights and responsibilities.

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Breaches of contract
Breaches of contract

What are the options?

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Manage your debt

Notice of breach of covenants


What is it? This is popularly called a Section 146 Notice (it is a notice required to be served by section 146 of the Law of Property Act 1925 and relates solely to business tenants) that warns a tenant who is in breach of covenant (other than the covenant to pay rent) of the landlord’s intention to forfeit the lease on ground of the breach of covenant. Why is it important? “Forfeiture” is the right of the landlord to re-enter the commercial property and take back possession of the property if a covenant has been breached. For the notice to be valid and binding the notice must specify the breach of covenant and if the breach is capable of remedy , require the tenant to remedy it and pay monetary compensation to the landlord for the breach. A landlord can only serve such a notice if the lease contains a right to forfeit the lease (i.e. a right of re-entry). The notice must also contain certain prescribed information. If the tenant does not remedy the breach within a reasonable time the landlord can start forfeiture proceedings in the County Court. Risks A landlord who wants to forfeit the lease must avoid “waiving” the breach of covenant. Waiver occurs where a landlord becomes aware of a breach of the lease but does not take action against the tenant within a reasonable period or acknowledges the continuation of the lease by for example demanding rent or service charges or accepting rent payments from the tenant.




Break notice


What is it? A Break Notice, also known as a Break Clauses or a break option, is an important contractual provision in a lease which allows either a landlord or tenant to bring a Lease to an early end. Some landlords often have a vested interest in making life difficult for a tenant seeking to exercise its option to break the lease by making the option subject to stringent conditions. Why is it important? Break Notices are akin to options and are therefore strictly construed by the courts . From the tenant’s perspective, a properly drafted Break Clause gives them the opportunity to avoid being tied into a lease that they can no longer afford. This is a safety-net for a tenant – especially if they are just starting out. Understandably though, a landlord who is receiving a steady rental income may be reluctant to lose a tenant, particularly in tough economic times. Risks Any tenant seeking to exercise the option to break the lease must check the lease carefully and ensure they follow the landlord’s “break clause conditions” to the letter. It is crucial when taking a lease that a tenant understands that the conditions of the Break Clause can easily defeat an option to break unless followed to the letter. If the conditions are not strictly followed the termination is not valid and the tenant remains a lessee until the expiry of the lease, the next break clause date or until the tenant is able to assign the lease with the landlord’s consent if there is such a provision in the lease. A properly advised tenant should refuse any condition, other than up-to date payment of principal rent and giving up occupation.




Tenants agreement to exclude security of tenure


What is it? The Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 provides tenants of business premises with rights of ‘security of tenure’. This means that once a business tenant’s lease expires, the tenant has the right to request a new lease on the same terms as the previous lease (subject to agreement on terms, such as the amount of rent, any legislative updates etc), except where the landlord has a statutory ground to refuse a new lease (for instance, if the tenant has failed to pay rent or the landlord wishes to redevelop the premises). Why is it important? When agreeing to enter into a commercial or business lease, one of the things that will be discussed when agreeing Heads of Terms is whether your lease will be ‘protected’ with security of tenure, or ‘contracted out’ i.e. excluded’ from security of tenure. It is quite common for landlords to require that security of tenure rights are excluded from a lease. They do this by asking the prospective tenant to sign a notice in front of an independent solicitor agreeing to the exclusion of security of tenure under the lease. Risks This notice means that a tenant of commercial premises will not have the automatic right to request a renewal of their lease at the end of the term of the lease, leaving the landlord free to let the property to another tenant at the end of the term. This is because landlords often wish to retain strict control over the occupation of their property. If security of tenure is excluded, you the tenant, must vacate the property at the end of the lease in accordance with its terms unless you have negotiated a new lease with the landlord separately.




Landlords notice to exclude security of tenure





Section 25 Notice


What is it? This is a notice by the landlord under s25 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954. Why is it important? It allows the landlord to start a procedure which will end either in the tenant being granted a new lease or in the tenant vacating. This notice cannot be given before the last year of the lease terms nor after the tenant has served a request for a new tenancy under s26 of the Act. Risks The s25 notice must state the date on which the landlord intends to bring the existing lease to an end.




Section 26 Notice


What is it? This is a notice given by the tenant requesting a new tenancy upon the termination of the old tenancy. Why is it important? The s26 request must specify the date on which the existing lease is to end. Risks This notice cannot be served before the last year of the agreed lease term nor can it be served after the landlord has served a s25 notice.




Licence for alterations


What is it? This is a licence from the landlord to the tenant giving the tenant the right to carry out specific works or alterations to the property that is being let. The alterations may be major or minor. Why is it important? The Licence should include provisions as to the manner in which the tenant will carry out the works, timescales, reinstatement and (to the extent applicable) the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015. Drawings and specifications showing the proposed works should be attached to the Licence so that it is clear what the landlord is consenting to. If the proposed alterations are not substantial (e.g. the erection of demountable partitioning or signage) you can use a simple Letter- Licence to Alter.




Section 27 Notice


What is it? A tenant has the right under s27 of the 1954 Act to bring the tenancy to an end by giving at least three months’ notice before the date on which the tenancy would otherwise expire. If the lease term has expired but the tenancy is still continuing under the 1954 Act the tenant may bring that continuing tenancy to an end by giving not less than three months’ notice in writing to the landlord.





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Business Relationships


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Recovering a debt

Invitation letter to a disciplinary appeal hearing for misconduct


What is it? Make sure you do things right when you discipline an employee. Our employment solicitors can provide you with a disciplinary hearing letter/notice to be sent to the employee which sets out in clear and simple terms the disciplinary allegations, process to be followed, the employee's rights and potential sanctions. Why is it important? If you are formally disciplining an employee for misconduct, this letter ensures that you are complying with the unfair dismissal laws. It also meets the requirements of the statutory ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures. It is always best practice to give the employee a right to appeal any misconduct decision. The letter should tell the employee they must appeal in writing with their grounds of appeal. If you accept an appeal by the employee, you should respond with a letter inviting the employee to an appeal hearing for misconduct. Risks Non-compliance with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures will be taken into account by an employment tribunal when deciding whether an employee has been treated fairly and can also result in the tribunal increasing the amount of compensation awarded your employee if the case went to court.




Invitation letter to a Appeal hearing for misconduct


What is it? The right to appeal against the outcome of disciplinary action is an important element of a fair disciplinary process. Where an employee appeals against a disciplinary sanction, the employer should invite them to a disciplinary appeal hearing. Why is it important? The ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures states that the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.Our employment solicitors can provide you with an invitation letter to an appeal hearing that helps ensure that your processes are watertight. The invitation should include information about the employee's right to be accompanied at the appeal hearing. Risks Non-compliance with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures will be taken into account by an employment tribunal when deciding whether an employee has been treated fairly and can also result in the tribunal increasing the amount of compensation awarded if the case went to court.




Disciplinary outcome letter for misconduct - warning or no action


What is it? This is a letter that can be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting for example, when the outcome is a warning, dismissal or no further action is to be taken by the employer.




Invitation letter to a performance appeal hearing


What is it? This is a letter that should be used to invite an employee to a performance appeal hearing.




Invitation letter to a performance hearing





Poor performance outcome letter - warning or no action


What is it? This is a letter that can be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the poor performance meeting when the outcome is a warning or no further action is to be taken.




Disciplinary procedure


What is it? A disciplinary procedure is a formal way for an employer to deal with an employee’s unacceptable or improper behaviour (‘misconduct’) or performance (‘capability’). Why is it important? You should put your disciplinary procedure in writing and make it easily available to all staff. IIt should say what performance and behaviour might lead to disciplinary action and what action your employer might take. It should also include the name of someone you can speak to if you do not agree with your employer’s disciplinary decision. Disciplinary steps : Your disciplinary procedure should include the following steps: A letter setting out the issue. A meeting to discuss the issue. A disciplinary decision. A chance to appeal this decision. Risks Before starting a disciplinary procedure against a member of staff , you should first see whether the problem can be resolved in an informal way. This can often be the quickest and easiest solution. If you need help in resolving an employment matter or dispute, please contact our employment solicitors on 01234 938089. We can provide you with advice on a fixed fee basis.




Suspension Letter


What is it? This is a letter that can be used to inform the employee that the employee will be suspended pending investigation of the disciplinary allegations.




Dismissal letter for misconduct


What is it? This Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting when that outcome is dismissal on the grounds of misconduct falling short of Gross Misconduct. Why is it important? To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Dismissal letter for poor performance


What is it? This Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting when that outcome is dismissal for poor performance. Why is it important? To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Gross misconduct dismissal letter


What is it? This Gross Misconduct Notice of Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting when that outcome is dismissal on the ground of gross misconduct. An employee can be dismissed “on the spot” for gross misconduct eg fighting at work. Why is it important? However it is best practice to follow up a gross misconduct “on the spot dismissal” with a letter fully explaining the dismissal and the reasons for the dismissal. Risks To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Dismissal letter for employees without unfair dismissal rights


What is it? This Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of their dismissal when they have under two years’ service with the employer. Why is it important? It is best practice to put an employee on a performance improvement plan(PIP) first before dismissing them irrespective of their length of service. This letter can be used where an employee is dismissed either with or without having been put on a performance improvement plan. In all cases, the employer should adopt a professional and respectful tone when communicating with the soon-to-be dismissed employee. Risks To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Appeal letter


What is it? This is a letter from an employee against whom a disciplinary sanction has been imposed appealing against the dismissal. If you need help in resolving an employment matter or dispute, please contact our employment solicitors on 01234 938089. We can provide you with advice on a fixed fee basis.




Invitation letter to a performance appraisal


What is it?

An appraisal is a formal process that allows you and a member of staff to assess the staff member’s performance over a period of time eg on a 6 month or 12 month basis. A detailed appraisal has a number of benefits for you and your employees.

Why is it important?

For example, it gives you the opportunity to:

1. review and provide feedback on their performance and set objectives to maximise performance.

2. It also gives the employee the opportunity to comment on their performance, suggest improvements and bring any problems to your attention.

3. It can therefore assist in motivating employees, resolution of problems and the prevention of legal disputes.

Our employment solicitors can provide you with an invitation to attend an appraisal meeting letter tailored to your specific requirements. This letter sets the date for the meeting, who will conduct the meeting and whether the member of staff needs to bring any particular documents or information to the meeting.

Contact our employment law solicitors on 01234 938089.





Landlord & Tenant problems

Rent commercial property - Commercial notices


What is it?

The Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 (as amended)governs the rights and obligation of landlords and tenants of premises which are occupied for business purposes.

Why is it important?

The commercial lease notices are the forms used to end or renew a commercial tenancy. Assuming that the parties have not contracted out of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954, each party will need to use a specific form. Landlords must use a Section 25 form while tenants must use a Section 26 form. The Section 25 Notice is a form that can be used by a landlord to either:

  1. end a tenancy with a proposal to start a new tenancy; or
  2. end a tenancy with reasons for refusing a new tenancy.

The Section 26 Notice is a form that can be used by a tenant to request a new tenancy.

There are strict time limits for serving a Section 25 or 26 notice.

Risks

If the landlord or tenant does not adhere to the time limits, they may end up losing their right to terminate the tenancy or request a new tenancy. It is therefore vital that as a commercial landlord or business tenant you clearly understand the law relating to service of commercial notices.

Please contact our commercial property solicitors if you require advice on your business tenancy or if you are a landlord. Our commercial solicitors are waiting for your call. Tel ; 01234 938098.




Commercial Landlord & Tenant problems


What is it?

Disputes can seriously affect your business as a tenant, and your investment as a landlord. When disputes arise in commercial leases they need to be addressed quickly and tactically to minimise disruption and loss.

Why is it important?

Our specialist property dispute solicitors advise commercial landlords and tenants on a wide range of issues including:

  • Break notices
  • Disputes concerning requests for landlord’s consent
  • Property injunctions
  • Forfeiture of commercial leases and applications for relief from forfeiture
  • Early termination of a commercial lease
  • Contested and uncontested business lease renewals
  • Commercial lease agreement interpretation
  • Rent reviews
  • Breach of covenant
  • Repair and dilapidation claims
  • Rent and service charge recovery

Risks

Our property disputes solicitors have some top tips for landlords to avoid problems.

Landlords:

1.Do a background check on all your tenants

2.Take a rent deposit

3.Get a guarantor if you have doubts about the prospective tenant’s creditworthiness.

4. Do an inventory before the tenant moves in

5. Ensure you have a break clause, rent review, early termination clause, dilapidations clause, landlord’s consent clause, forfeiture clause and other relevant clauses in the lease agreement

5. Insert an exclusion of security tenure in the lease at the time of grant of the lease

If you are a commercial landlord and would like some advice on dealing with a commercial landlord and tenant problem or dispute, then do call us on 01234 938089 for an initial chat, at no obligation, or fill out our enquiry form. One of our property dispute specialists will get in touch, and help you get things back on track.


If you are a commercial tenant and would like some advice on dealing with a commercial landlord and tenant problem, call us on 01234 938090 for an initial chat, at no obligation, or fill out our enquiry form. One of our property dispute specialists will get in touch, and help you get things back on track.




Rent arrears


What is it?

One of the most important issues you face as a landlord is ensuring that your commercial tenant pays rent on time. If your tenant fails to pay the rent and other sums due under a lease, there are several remedies you have which will enable you get the breach remedied and recover payment but you need to decide the best course of action taking into account your circumstances, your commercial tenant’s circumstances, current market conditions and any future plans you may have for the property. Depending on your long-term objectives, you will need to consider the action to take and how to protect your position.

Your options are (1) negotiating payment in instalments (2) forfeiture (3) drawing down on the rent deposit if there is a provision to that effect in the rent deposit deed (4) pursue a guarantor (4) pursue a former tenant under an Authorised Guarantee Agreement (AGA); (5) serve a Statutory demand followed by insolvency and winding-up (6) use the Commercial Rent Arrears recovery (CRAR) procedure – this involves instructing an enforcement agent to take control of a tenant's goods and sell them on to recover the debt. This procedure is complex -various notices need to be served on the tenant throughout the process. Certain conditions also need to be satisfied before you can use CRAR and (6) Issue Court proceedings.

If you are a landlord and your commercial tenant has failed to pay its rent, why not speak with one of our specialist commercial property solicitors on 01234 938089.




Dilapidations


What is it?

Dilapidations is a term used when referring to the condition of a commercial property during the term of the tenancy or when the lease ends. It means the same as disrepair and is linked to the commercial tenant’s repairing and decoration obligations in the lease agreement.

Why is it important?

Most commercial leases contain a clause that the tenant will be responsible for dilapidations. The landlord may serve a Schedule of Dilapidations on the tenant at different stages of the tenancy:

A schedule served during the fixed term of a lease is known as an interim schedule. It will specify the disrepair alleged by the landlord and the remedial works which the landlord requires the tenant to undertake.

A schedule served within the last three years of the term is a terminal schedule.

A schedule served at or after the end of a lease term is a final schedule of dilapidations

The difference between an interim schedule and a terminal schedule when compared with a final schedule is that whilst the first two may contain the same alleged breaches of covenant and details of remedial work required as an interim or terminal schedule in this case the tenant will not have an option to carry out the works himself since he no longer occupies the property. The landlord’s remedy is to claim damages to cover the cost of remedial works, AND loss of rent, service charges, rates, professional fees and VAT for any period during which the property is off the lettings market. This may have serious financial implications for business tenants.

Risks

Schedules of Dilapidations are often the cause of disputes between landlords and tenants, the result of which may mean court action . Tenants should ensure that they fully understand these implications and take steps at the start to minimise their liabilities before signing the commercial lease.

For instance, when negotiating a new lease, as an alternative to accepting full liability, the tenant may insist that the repairing liability be restricted to leaving the building in no worse condition than at the start of the lease. Further, the word “repair” in a lease sometimes includes a liability to renew, for example, where a roof was so dilapidated that renewal was the only practical option. To limit any repairing liability the tenant should instruct a Building Surveyor to prepare a Schedule of Condition, recording the state of decoration and any pre-existing items of disrepair.

These precautions as also relevant on assignment where a new tenant takes on the obligations of an existing tenant. Alterations and disrepair must also be considered carefully by a tenant considering assignment of another tenant’s lease. Further, as an alternative to accepting full liability if breaches and alterations are identified before the lease purchase, the tenant may be able to negotiate a reverse premium.

If you have a dilapidations dispute and need information and advice, please contact our expert commercial property lawyers.




Service of Section 146 Notices


What is it?

This is a notice under section 146 of the Law of Property Act 1925 (Section 146 Notice) that warns a tenant who is in breach of covenant (other than the covenant to pay rent) of the landlord’s intention to forfeit the lease on ground of the breach of covenant.

Why is it important?

“Forfeiture” is the right of the landlord to re-enter the commercial property and take back possession of the property if a covenant (other than a covenant to pay rent )has been breached.

For the notice to be valid and binding the notice must specify the breach complained of and if the breach is capable of remedy, require the tenant to remedy it and ask the tenant to pay monetary compensation to the landlord for the breach.

A landlord can only serve such a notice if the lease contains a right to forfeit the lease (i.e. a right of re-entry). The notice must also contain certain prescribed information. If the tenant does not remedy the breach within a reasonable time the landlord can start forfeiture proceedings in the County Court.

A landlord who wants to forfeit the lease must avoid “waiving” the breach of covenant. Waiver occurs where a landlord becomes aware of a breach of the lease but does not take action against the tenant within a reasonable period or acknowledges the continuation of the lease by for example demanding rent or service charges or accepting rent payments from the tenant.




Forfeiture of leases (including possession proceedings)


What is it?

A commercial property lease usually continues until its end date unless you include a clause to end it earlier. As a landlord, you can only end a lease when the tenant fails to pay rent or fails to meet other lease obligations.

Forfeiture occurs when a landlord ends the lease due to the tenant breaching the terms of that lease by being in arrears with rent or by significantly breaching any other covenant.

Before taking action and seeking possession of the property, you should seek legal advice. If you are a tenant and want to avoid forfeiture or seek court relief from forfeiture, you should also seek legal advice. We are highly experienced in this area of law, so please contact our commercial property lawyers.

Subject to the terms of the lease agreement (legal advice should be sought) a commercial lease generally cannot be forfeited by any other breach of the lease except non-payment of the agreed rent. If a different breach of lease has occurred, then the landlord should serve the tenant with a Section 146 notice (Nazish – please connect the words “Section 146 notice” to the other places in the website where we have defined a Section 146 notice) which should state exactly what that breach is and must give the tenant a set period of time to rectify the breach.

Forfeiture Requirements:

For the landlord to exercise his right to forfeit the lease and take possession there must be an express clause in the lease that gives the landlord the right to forfeit, the breach should be a fundamental breach such as not paying rent or other form of very serious breach, the landlord must take the appropriate procedural steps (i.e. Section 146 Notice) and the landlord must not waive the right to forfeit.

If the tenant complies with the notice and remedies the breach within the given time the landlord can no longer proceed with forfeiture but if the tenant continues to commit a breach of the lease the landlord can issue proceedings for forfeiture of the lease in the County Court.

For more information on forfeiture of a commercial lease for non-payment of rent or otherwise or Section 146 Notices please feel free to contact our lease forfeiture specialist solicitors.




Service of section 25 notice and issue of proceedings


What is it?

This is a notice by the landlord under s25 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954. It allows the landlord to start a procedure which will end either in the tenant being granted a new lease or in the tenant vacating. This notice cannot be given before the last year of the lease terms nor after the tenant has served a request for a new tenancy under s26 of the Act. The s25 notice must state the date on which the landlord intends to bring the existing lease to an end.

When can the parties apply to the court?

Either party may apply to the court as soon as the tenant has received the Section 25 form from the landlord. However, it is usual practice for the parties to try to reach an agreement before going to court.

If a Section 25 form is served by the landlord, the last day for either party to apply to court is the date the tenancy will expire as set out in the Section 25 form. Whilst the parties can agree to an extension of this deadline, but they must do so in writing before the expiry of the original deadline. They can also agree to further extensions, provided they do so before the current extension runs out. If the tenant fails to apply to the court in time, the tenant loses the right to renew the tenancy.





Reorganisation & Redundancies

My GP has asked me to self-isolate as my father is exhibiting symptoms of coronavirus. He has not yet been tested. Am I entitled to my pay during my period of self-isolation?


Government guidance provides that from 13 March 2020 an employee who is self-isolating in accordance with the guidance/doctor’s recommendation will be deemed incapable of work and will also be entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) from Day One (1) as long as the employee satisfies the SSP earnings criteria. The minimum weekly pay to qualify for ss is currently £118 per week. The current SSP weekly rate is £94.50p. You may also be entitled to contractual sick pay from your employer if you have a company sick pay scheme and your employment contract provides for this. This rate is generally higher as it is usually based on an employee’s salary. SSP is payable for up to 28 weeks.




I am well but do not feel like attending work because I am worried about coronavirus. Can I insist on working from home?


What is it?

If you are worried about coronavirus but do not fall into any of the groups that self-isolate you should check the latest guidance from the government and talk to your employer. As you may know the guidance provides that if possible all employees should work from home. If you fall within one of the high-risk groups, have an underlying medical condition or are very concerned about the virus your employer may be able to arrange for you to work from home, or take your standard or unpaid annual leave.

If you have any specific concerns eg an underlying medical condition which may amount to a disability under the Equality Act 2010 your employer may be able to arrange for you to work from home as a reasonable adjustment under the Equality Act 2010. If your employer has considered your request and cannot provide you with homeworking facilities or any other suitable alternatives and you decide not to attend work your employer may be entitled to treat your non-attendance at work as a breach of contract and may withhold your pay.




I am self-employed. A friend has just told me that the Government has now delayed implementation of the new IR35 rules because of the pandemic. Is this true?


Yes it is true. The new off-payroll working rules (IR35) in the private sector were due to be operational on 6 April 2020. However, in view of the pandemic crisis the Government has moved the start date back 12 months. It is therefore likely to come into effect on 6 April 2021.




My employer is complaining that the company can no longer afford to pay staff as a result of the pandemic. It is true that business appears to be drying out. If the pandemic continues can my employer fire me?


Before considering firing an employee as a result of cashflow problems your employer should consider “furloughing” you under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and other available methods of avoiding redundancies.

“Furlough” means a temporary leave of absence from work. The CJRS is a temporary scheme set up by the Government to support employers whose operations have been affected by coronavirus. It allows an employer to keep staff on the company’s payroll without them working for a limited period of time. Under this scheme an employer can claim for 80% of a “furloughed” employee’s usual monthly salary costs (up to£2500 per month) plus the employee’s National Insurance contributions and minimum automatic enrolment employer pension contributions on that salary. The details are set out on the government’s website at www.gov.uk.

Other options available to your employer would be a lay-off, redundancy and a termination of your contract if there is a clause in your contract that provides for termination in such circumstances or if you have under two years of employment. These are different from “furloughing” staff as the employee is no longer on the payroll. A lay-off means that an employee is sent home without normal pay for a time period. However, your consent to a lay-off is required unless there is a specific clause in your contract that allows a lay-off. Making you redundant would result in a termination of your employment with your employer. If your employer decides it has no alternative other than to go ahead with redundancies it should fully consult and maintain records to show why it wants to go ahead with firing you despite the availability of the CJRS.

Your employer must have a valid reason for dismissing you. There are procedures that an employer who wishes to make staff must follow. Firing you in breach of the terms in your contract and of the law would be a breach of contract. Employees may agree to a period of lay off as an alternative to the employer making redundancies, however an employer should obtain specific legal advice if it is considering lay-off.

We would suggest that you speak to your employer about placing you on “furlough”. When the furlough scheme has ended your employer can decide whether there is enough work for you and your fellow employees to return. If the work has diminished or ceased then your employer can decide to implement redundancies in accordance with the redundancy procedures .




I was taken on to provide temporary maternity cover. My employer has now dismissed me on the ground that the person for whom I provided maternity cover is returning next week.


The dismissal is fair if your employer made it clear at the start of your placement that the post was temporary.




I want to issue proceedings against my manager. Can you help me?


You may be able to make a claim to an employment tribunal if you have a problem at work that you have not been able to resolve. Before you issue proceedings it is a good idea to speak to your employer and discuss options with your employer about how you can resolve matters.

You can speak to your employer informally or put in a formal grievance if informal discussion does not resolve the matter.

You should also Inform ACAS that you are making a claim.

ACAS will offer you the option of 'early conciliation'. This is a free service. It can help you and your employer resolve the problem before you issue a claim.

You should always consider early conciliation as making a claim to a tribunal and fighting your claim can be expensive, time consuming and difficult for everyone involved.

Time limits/Limitation

A claim to an employment tribunal must generally be made within 3 months less 1 day.

This is known as the 'limitation date'.

For example, if you want to make a claim for unfair dismissal, you have 3 months less 1 day from the date of termination of your employment to make your claim.

If your claim is for equal pay or redundancy pay or equal pay you must make your claim within 6 months.

Fees - How much do I have to pay to make a claim to the Employment Tribunal?

You do not have to pay a fee to make a claim to the Employment Tribunal.





Commercial notices

Notice of breach of covenants


What is it? This is popularly called a Section 146 Notice (it is a notice required to be served by section 146 of the Law of Property Act 1925 and relates solely to business tenants) that warns a tenant who is in breach of covenant (other than the covenant to pay rent) of the landlord’s intention to forfeit the lease on ground of the breach of covenant. Why is it important? “Forfeiture” is the right of the landlord to re-enter the commercial property and take back possession of the property if a covenant has been breached. For the notice to be valid and binding the notice must specify the breach of covenant and if the breach is capable of remedy , require the tenant to remedy it and pay monetary compensation to the landlord for the breach. A landlord can only serve such a notice if the lease contains a right to forfeit the lease (i.e. a right of re-entry). The notice must also contain certain prescribed information. If the tenant does not remedy the breach within a reasonable time the landlord can start forfeiture proceedings in the County Court. Risks A landlord who wants to forfeit the lease must avoid “waiving” the breach of covenant. Waiver occurs where a landlord becomes aware of a breach of the lease but does not take action against the tenant within a reasonable period or acknowledges the continuation of the lease by for example demanding rent or service charges or accepting rent payments from the tenant.




Break notice


What is it? A Break Notice, also known as a Break Clauses or a break option, is an important contractual provision in a lease which allows either a landlord or tenant to bring a Lease to an early end. Some landlords often have a vested interest in making life difficult for a tenant seeking to exercise its option to break the lease by making the option subject to stringent conditions. Why is it important? Break Notices are akin to options and are therefore strictly construed by the courts . From the tenant’s perspective, a properly drafted Break Clause gives them the opportunity to avoid being tied into a lease that they can no longer afford. This is a safety-net for a tenant – especially if they are just starting out. Understandably though, a landlord who is receiving a steady rental income may be reluctant to lose a tenant, particularly in tough economic times. Risks Any tenant seeking to exercise the option to break the lease must check the lease carefully and ensure they follow the landlord’s “break clause conditions” to the letter. It is crucial when taking a lease that a tenant understands that the conditions of the Break Clause can easily defeat an option to break unless followed to the letter. If the conditions are not strictly followed the termination is not valid and the tenant remains a lessee until the expiry of the lease, the next break clause date or until the tenant is able to assign the lease with the landlord’s consent if there is such a provision in the lease. A properly advised tenant should refuse any condition, other than up-to date payment of principal rent and giving up occupation.




Tenants agreement to exclude security of tenure


What is it? The Landlord and Tenant Act 1954 provides tenants of business premises with rights of ‘security of tenure’. This means that once a business tenant’s lease expires, the tenant has the right to request a new lease on the same terms as the previous lease (subject to agreement on terms, such as the amount of rent, any legislative updates etc), except where the landlord has a statutory ground to refuse a new lease (for instance, if the tenant has failed to pay rent or the landlord wishes to redevelop the premises). Why is it important? When agreeing to enter into a commercial or business lease, one of the things that will be discussed when agreeing Heads of Terms is whether your lease will be ‘protected’ with security of tenure, or ‘contracted out’ i.e. excluded’ from security of tenure. It is quite common for landlords to require that security of tenure rights are excluded from a lease. They do this by asking the prospective tenant to sign a notice in front of an independent solicitor agreeing to the exclusion of security of tenure under the lease. Risks This notice means that a tenant of commercial premises will not have the automatic right to request a renewal of their lease at the end of the term of the lease, leaving the landlord free to let the property to another tenant at the end of the term. This is because landlords often wish to retain strict control over the occupation of their property. If security of tenure is excluded, you the tenant, must vacate the property at the end of the lease in accordance with its terms unless you have negotiated a new lease with the landlord separately.




Landlords notice to exclude security of tenure





Section 25 Notice


What is it? This is a notice by the landlord under s25 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1954. Why is it important? It allows the landlord to start a procedure which will end either in the tenant being granted a new lease or in the tenant vacating. This notice cannot be given before the last year of the lease terms nor after the tenant has served a request for a new tenancy under s26 of the Act. Risks The s25 notice must state the date on which the landlord intends to bring the existing lease to an end.




Section 26 Notice


What is it? This is a notice given by the tenant requesting a new tenancy upon the termination of the old tenancy. Why is it important? The s26 request must specify the date on which the existing lease is to end. Risks This notice cannot be served before the last year of the agreed lease term nor can it be served after the landlord has served a s25 notice.




Licence for alterations


What is it? This is a licence from the landlord to the tenant giving the tenant the right to carry out specific works or alterations to the property that is being let. The alterations may be major or minor. Why is it important? The Licence should include provisions as to the manner in which the tenant will carry out the works, timescales, reinstatement and (to the extent applicable) the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2015. Drawings and specifications showing the proposed works should be attached to the Licence so that it is clear what the landlord is consenting to. If the proposed alterations are not substantial (e.g. the erection of demountable partitioning or signage) you can use a simple Letter- Licence to Alter.




Section 27 Notice


What is it? A tenant has the right under s27 of the 1954 Act to bring the tenancy to an end by giving at least three months’ notice before the date on which the tenancy would otherwise expire. If the lease term has expired but the tenancy is still continuing under the 1954 Act the tenant may bring that continuing tenancy to an end by giving not less than three months’ notice in writing to the landlord.





Managing licenses


Running an online business


Protecting your IP


Business Relationships


Writing a business plan


Breaches of contract

Invitation letter to a disciplinary appeal hearing for misconduct


What is it? Make sure you do things right when you discipline an employee. Our employment solicitors can provide you with a disciplinary hearing letter/notice to be sent to the employee which sets out in clear and simple terms the disciplinary allegations, process to be followed, the employee's rights and potential sanctions. Why is it important? If you are formally disciplining an employee for misconduct, this letter ensures that you are complying with the unfair dismissal laws. It also meets the requirements of the statutory ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures. It is always best practice to give the employee a right to appeal any misconduct decision. The letter should tell the employee they must appeal in writing with their grounds of appeal. If you accept an appeal by the employee, you should respond with a letter inviting the employee to an appeal hearing for misconduct. Risks Non-compliance with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures will be taken into account by an employment tribunal when deciding whether an employee has been treated fairly and can also result in the tribunal increasing the amount of compensation awarded your employee if the case went to court.




Invitation letter to a Appeal hearing for misconduct


What is it? The right to appeal against the outcome of disciplinary action is an important element of a fair disciplinary process. Where an employee appeals against a disciplinary sanction, the employer should invite them to a disciplinary appeal hearing. Why is it important? The ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures states that the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.Our employment solicitors can provide you with an invitation letter to an appeal hearing that helps ensure that your processes are watertight. The invitation should include information about the employee's right to be accompanied at the appeal hearing. Risks Non-compliance with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures will be taken into account by an employment tribunal when deciding whether an employee has been treated fairly and can also result in the tribunal increasing the amount of compensation awarded if the case went to court.




Disciplinary outcome letter for misconduct - warning or no action


What is it? This is a letter that can be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting for example, when the outcome is a warning, dismissal or no further action is to be taken by the employer.




Invitation letter to a performance appeal hearing


What is it? This is a letter that should be used to invite an employee to a performance appeal hearing.




Invitation letter to a performance hearing





Poor performance outcome letter - warning or no action


What is it? This is a letter that can be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the poor performance meeting when the outcome is a warning or no further action is to be taken.




Disciplinary procedure


What is it? A disciplinary procedure is a formal way for an employer to deal with an employee’s unacceptable or improper behaviour (‘misconduct’) or performance (‘capability’). Why is it important? You should put your disciplinary procedure in writing and make it easily available to all staff. IIt should say what performance and behaviour might lead to disciplinary action and what action your employer might take. It should also include the name of someone you can speak to if you do not agree with your employer’s disciplinary decision. Disciplinary steps : Your disciplinary procedure should include the following steps: A letter setting out the issue. A meeting to discuss the issue. A disciplinary decision. A chance to appeal this decision. Risks Before starting a disciplinary procedure against a member of staff , you should first see whether the problem can be resolved in an informal way. This can often be the quickest and easiest solution. If you need help in resolving an employment matter or dispute, please contact our employment solicitors on 01234 938089. We can provide you with advice on a fixed fee basis.




Suspension Letter


What is it? This is a letter that can be used to inform the employee that the employee will be suspended pending investigation of the disciplinary allegations.




Dismissal letter for misconduct


What is it? This Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting when that outcome is dismissal on the grounds of misconduct falling short of Gross Misconduct. Why is it important? To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Dismissal letter for poor performance


What is it? This Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting when that outcome is dismissal for poor performance. Why is it important? To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Gross misconduct dismissal letter


What is it? This Gross Misconduct Notice of Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting when that outcome is dismissal on the ground of gross misconduct. An employee can be dismissed “on the spot” for gross misconduct eg fighting at work. Why is it important? However it is best practice to follow up a gross misconduct “on the spot dismissal” with a letter fully explaining the dismissal and the reasons for the dismissal. Risks To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Dismissal letter for employees without unfair dismissal rights


What is it? This Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of their dismissal when they have under two years’ service with the employer. Why is it important? It is best practice to put an employee on a performance improvement plan(PIP) first before dismissing them irrespective of their length of service. This letter can be used where an employee is dismissed either with or without having been put on a performance improvement plan. In all cases, the employer should adopt a professional and respectful tone when communicating with the soon-to-be dismissed employee. Risks To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Appeal letter


What is it? This is a letter from an employee against whom a disciplinary sanction has been imposed appealing against the dismissal. If you need help in resolving an employment matter or dispute, please contact our employment solicitors on 01234 938089. We can provide you with advice on a fixed fee basis.




Invitation letter to a performance appraisal


What is it?

An appraisal is a formal process that allows you and a member of staff to assess the staff member’s performance over a period of time eg on a 6 month or 12 month basis. A detailed appraisal has a number of benefits for you and your employees.

Why is it important?

For example, it gives you the opportunity to:

1. review and provide feedback on their performance and set objectives to maximise performance.

2. It also gives the employee the opportunity to comment on their performance, suggest improvements and bring any problems to your attention.

3. It can therefore assist in motivating employees, resolution of problems and the prevention of legal disputes.

Our employment solicitors can provide you with an invitation to attend an appraisal meeting letter tailored to your specific requirements. This letter sets the date for the meeting, who will conduct the meeting and whether the member of staff needs to bring any particular documents or information to the meeting.

Contact our employment law solicitors on 01234 938089.





 
 

Issues with employer

My GP has asked me to self-isolate as my father is exhibiting symptoms of coronavirus. He has not yet been tested. Am I entitled to my pay during my period of self-isolation?


Government guidance provides that from 13 March 2020 an employee who is self-isolating in accordance with the guidance/doctor’s recommendation will be deemed incapable of work and will also be entitled to Statutory Sick Pay (SSP) from Day One (1) as long as the employee satisfies the SSP earnings criteria. The minimum weekly pay to qualify for ss is currently £118 per week. The current SSP weekly rate is £94.50p. You may also be entitled to contractual sick pay from your employer if you have a company sick pay scheme and your employment contract provides for this. This rate is generally higher as it is usually based on an employee’s salary. SSP is payable for up to 28 weeks.




I am well but do not feel like attending work because I am worried about coronavirus. Can I insist on working from home?


What is it?

If you are worried about coronavirus but do not fall into any of the groups that self-isolate you should check the latest guidance from the government and talk to your employer. As you may know the guidance provides that if possible all employees should work from home. If you fall within one of the high-risk groups, have an underlying medical condition or are very concerned about the virus your employer may be able to arrange for you to work from home, or take your standard or unpaid annual leave.

If you have any specific concerns eg an underlying medical condition which may amount to a disability under the Equality Act 2010 your employer may be able to arrange for you to work from home as a reasonable adjustment under the Equality Act 2010. If your employer has considered your request and cannot provide you with homeworking facilities or any other suitable alternatives and you decide not to attend work your employer may be entitled to treat your non-attendance at work as a breach of contract and may withhold your pay.




I am self-employed. A friend has just told me that the Government has now delayed implementation of the new IR35 rules because of the pandemic. Is this true?


Yes it is true. The new off-payroll working rules (IR35) in the private sector were due to be operational on 6 April 2020. However, in view of the pandemic crisis the Government has moved the start date back 12 months. It is therefore likely to come into effect on 6 April 2021.




My employer is complaining that the company can no longer afford to pay staff as a result of the pandemic. It is true that business appears to be drying out. If the pandemic continues can my employer fire me?


Before considering firing an employee as a result of cashflow problems your employer should consider “furloughing” you under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and other available methods of avoiding redundancies.

“Furlough” means a temporary leave of absence from work. The CJRS is a temporary scheme set up by the Government to support employers whose operations have been affected by coronavirus. It allows an employer to keep staff on the company’s payroll without them working for a limited period of time. Under this scheme an employer can claim for 80% of a “furloughed” employee’s usual monthly salary costs (up to£2500 per month) plus the employee’s National Insurance contributions and minimum automatic enrolment employer pension contributions on that salary. The details are set out on the government’s website at www.gov.uk.

Other options available to your employer would be a lay-off, redundancy and a termination of your contract if there is a clause in your contract that provides for termination in such circumstances or if you have under two years of employment. These are different from “furloughing” staff as the employee is no longer on the payroll. A lay-off means that an employee is sent home without normal pay for a time period. However, your consent to a lay-off is required unless there is a specific clause in your contract that allows a lay-off. Making you redundant would result in a termination of your employment with your employer. If your employer decides it has no alternative other than to go ahead with redundancies it should fully consult and maintain records to show why it wants to go ahead with firing you despite the availability of the CJRS.

Your employer must have a valid reason for dismissing you. There are procedures that an employer who wishes to make staff must follow. Firing you in breach of the terms in your contract and of the law would be a breach of contract. Employees may agree to a period of lay off as an alternative to the employer making redundancies, however an employer should obtain specific legal advice if it is considering lay-off.

We would suggest that you speak to your employer about placing you on “furlough”. When the furlough scheme has ended your employer can decide whether there is enough work for you and your fellow employees to return. If the work has diminished or ceased then your employer can decide to implement redundancies in accordance with the redundancy procedures .




I was taken on to provide temporary maternity cover. My employer has now dismissed me on the ground that the person for whom I provided maternity cover is returning next week.


The dismissal is fair if your employer made it clear at the start of your placement that the post was temporary.




I want to issue proceedings against my manager. Can you help me?


You may be able to make a claim to an employment tribunal if you have a problem at work that you have not been able to resolve. Before you issue proceedings it is a good idea to speak to your employer and discuss options with your employer about how you can resolve matters.

You can speak to your employer informally or put in a formal grievance if informal discussion does not resolve the matter.

You should also Inform ACAS that you are making a claim.

ACAS will offer you the option of 'early conciliation'. This is a free service. It can help you and your employer resolve the problem before you issue a claim.

You should always consider early conciliation as making a claim to a tribunal and fighting your claim can be expensive, time consuming and difficult for everyone involved.

Time limits/Limitation

A claim to an employment tribunal must generally be made within 3 months less 1 day.

This is known as the 'limitation date'.

For example, if you want to make a claim for unfair dismissal, you have 3 months less 1 day from the date of termination of your employment to make your claim.

If your claim is for equal pay or redundancy pay or equal pay you must make your claim within 6 months.

Fees - How much do I have to pay to make a claim to the Employment Tribunal?

You do not have to pay a fee to make a claim to the Employment Tribunal.





Managing employee performance

Invitation letter to a disciplinary appeal hearing for misconduct


What is it? Make sure you do things right when you discipline an employee. Our employment solicitors can provide you with a disciplinary hearing letter/notice to be sent to the employee which sets out in clear and simple terms the disciplinary allegations, process to be followed, the employee's rights and potential sanctions. Why is it important? If you are formally disciplining an employee for misconduct, this letter ensures that you are complying with the unfair dismissal laws. It also meets the requirements of the statutory ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures. It is always best practice to give the employee a right to appeal any misconduct decision. The letter should tell the employee they must appeal in writing with their grounds of appeal. If you accept an appeal by the employee, you should respond with a letter inviting the employee to an appeal hearing for misconduct. Risks Non-compliance with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures will be taken into account by an employment tribunal when deciding whether an employee has been treated fairly and can also result in the tribunal increasing the amount of compensation awarded your employee if the case went to court.




Invitation letter to a Appeal hearing for misconduct


What is it? The right to appeal against the outcome of disciplinary action is an important element of a fair disciplinary process. Where an employee appeals against a disciplinary sanction, the employer should invite them to a disciplinary appeal hearing. Why is it important? The ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures states that the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.Our employment solicitors can provide you with an invitation letter to an appeal hearing that helps ensure that your processes are watertight. The invitation should include information about the employee's right to be accompanied at the appeal hearing. Risks Non-compliance with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures will be taken into account by an employment tribunal when deciding whether an employee has been treated fairly and can also result in the tribunal increasing the amount of compensation awarded if the case went to court.




Disciplinary outcome letter for misconduct - warning or no action


What is it? This is a letter that can be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting for example, when the outcome is a warning, dismissal or no further action is to be taken by the employer.




Invitation letter to a performance appeal hearing


What is it? This is a letter that should be used to invite an employee to a performance appeal hearing.




Invitation letter to a performance hearing





Poor performance outcome letter - warning or no action


What is it? This is a letter that can be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the poor performance meeting when the outcome is a warning or no further action is to be taken.




Disciplinary procedure


What is it? A disciplinary procedure is a formal way for an employer to deal with an employee’s unacceptable or improper behaviour (‘misconduct’) or performance (‘capability’). Why is it important? You should put your disciplinary procedure in writing and make it easily available to all staff. IIt should say what performance and behaviour might lead to disciplinary action and what action your employer might take. It should also include the name of someone you can speak to if you do not agree with your employer’s disciplinary decision. Disciplinary steps : Your disciplinary procedure should include the following steps: A letter setting out the issue. A meeting to discuss the issue. A disciplinary decision. A chance to appeal this decision. Risks Before starting a disciplinary procedure against a member of staff , you should first see whether the problem can be resolved in an informal way. This can often be the quickest and easiest solution. If you need help in resolving an employment matter or dispute, please contact our employment solicitors on 01234 938089. We can provide you with advice on a fixed fee basis.




Suspension Letter


What is it? This is a letter that can be used to inform the employee that the employee will be suspended pending investigation of the disciplinary allegations.




Dismissal letter for misconduct


What is it? This Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting when that outcome is dismissal on the grounds of misconduct falling short of Gross Misconduct. Why is it important? To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Dismissal letter for poor performance


What is it? This Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting when that outcome is dismissal for poor performance. Why is it important? To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Gross misconduct dismissal letter


What is it? This Gross Misconduct Notice of Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of the outcome of the disciplinary meeting when that outcome is dismissal on the ground of gross misconduct. An employee can be dismissed “on the spot” for gross misconduct eg fighting at work. Why is it important? However it is best practice to follow up a gross misconduct “on the spot dismissal” with a letter fully explaining the dismissal and the reasons for the dismissal. Risks To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Dismissal letter for employees without unfair dismissal rights


What is it? This Dismissal Letter should be used to inform the employee of their dismissal when they have under two years’ service with the employer. Why is it important? It is best practice to put an employee on a performance improvement plan(PIP) first before dismissing them irrespective of their length of service. This letter can be used where an employee is dismissed either with or without having been put on a performance improvement plan. In all cases, the employer should adopt a professional and respectful tone when communicating with the soon-to-be dismissed employee. Risks To comply with the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures the employee should be given the right to appeal against any disciplinary sanction or decision.




Appeal letter


What is it? This is a letter from an employee against whom a disciplinary sanction has been imposed appealing against the dismissal. If you need help in resolving an employment matter or dispute, please contact our employment solicitors on 01234 938089. We can provide you with advice on a fixed fee basis.




Invitation letter to a performance appraisal


What is it?

An appraisal is a formal process that allows you and a member of staff to assess the staff member’s performance over a period of time eg on a 6 month or 12 month basis. A detailed appraisal has a number of benefits for you and your employees.

Why is it important?

For example, it gives you the opportunity to:

1. review and provide feedback on their performance and set objectives to maximise performance.

2. It also gives the employee the opportunity to comment on their performance, suggest improvements and bring any problems to your attention.

3. It can therefore assist in motivating employees, resolution of problems and the prevention of legal disputes.

Our employment solicitors can provide you with an invitation to attend an appraisal meeting letter tailored to your specific requirements. This letter sets the date for the meeting, who will conduct the meeting and whether the member of staff needs to bring any particular documents or information to the meeting.

Contact our employment law solicitors on 01234 938089.